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How can I implement PRG in Rails?

I used PRG in Rails, but I am not totally convinced it's right. I was wondering is there any better way to handle it in Rails?

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I 100% believe PRG in Rails is the closest/most right thing(at this time). The best solution I have used in the past was playframework 1.2.x where you just validataion.keep() storing errors in play's flash error cookie and params.flash() storing user input in another flash cookie and the GET controller meethod needed no code...it just worked perfect and we had no back/refresh button problems ever...it was perfect nor did we need to worry about clearing out the session. flash is definitely where you want it so you don't need to even worry about clearing a session. – Dean Hiller Mar 28 '14 at 22:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

I don't know how popular PRG pattern is and why one has to religiously stick to the "redirect" on failure aspect of it (actually, one good reason is sometimes you dont want to deal with the "setup" complexity at create failure and keep things dry).

What you basically need is to transfer the params for :user to new. I think @Hitesh's solution above is quite close.

class UsersController < ApplicationController

  def new
    if flash[:user_params]
      @user = User.new(flash[:user_params])
      @user.valid?
    else
      @user = User.new
    end
  end

  def create
    @user = User.new(params[:user])

    if @user.save
      # clears previously stored user if there is any
      flash[:notice] = "User created."
      redirect_to '/'
    else
      flash[:error] = "Error saving User"
      flash[:user_params] = params[:user]
      redirect_to :action => :new
    end
  end
end
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would you mind telling me the difference between the above code with the code that I posted in my blog, it looks almost same to me, in fact the code in my blog is rather short and concise. – kazimanzurrashid May 9 '11 at 19:17
    
Sure! I just didn't want to store the whole user object in flash, only the parameters. Calling valid? on the user, the object recovers the errors to be displayed. I just dont feel comfortable stuffing the whole user objects with all the other irrelevant stuff. – Aditya Sanghi May 9 '11 at 19:25
    
Aditya that is indeed a good point, I should only store the parameter values not thee whole object. – kazimanzurrashid May 10 '11 at 19:59
1  
why one has to religiously stick to the "redirect" on failure - because without PRG, the back button and refresh button stop working the way users would expect....it makes for an ugly user experience so sticking with PRG on everything makes it flow nice. – Dean Hiller Mar 26 '14 at 18:46
    
I see no error per field which is definitely needed. I prefer playframework 1.2.x style of simply validation.keep() and params.flash() which store the params of the form for redisplay and the errors for redisplay per field. I can't seem to find any good solution for rails 3 :( :(. playframework seemed to work much better here. – Dean Hiller Mar 28 '14 at 22:07

I'm no expert in these matters, but this looks good. From what I understand flash is a part of the session. So the answers telling you to switch to session seem a bit misguided. In this case you want the data to be cleared after the redirect. Other than shoving it in the session, I'm not sure where you would put it.

As far as your cookie size increasing, well, the default session provider for Rails is a cookie in Rails 3. You could swap the session provider out if you wanted to keep the data server side. It is encrypted though, so you are probably okay with the data in the cookie, unless size is an issue.

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Flash is a similar to asp.net mvc tempdata, lives only next request. Most the code I have seen flash is used to store messages, not to store any domain object which I did and that is what really bothering me. – kazimanzurrashid May 9 '11 at 20:14

use below code

class UsersController < ApplicationController

  def new
    @user = User.new(session[:user_param])
   session[:user_param]=nil
  end

  def create

    @user = User.new(params[:user])

    if @user.save
      # clears previously stored user if there is any
      flash.discard(:user)
      redirect_to '/'
    else
      session[:user_param] = @user
      redirect_to :action => :new
    end

  end

end
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Use the session, Luke

The way you implemented it in your blog post is quite fine, however you may want to use session instead of flash to store your @user and optionally use the ActiveRecord session store to keep cookies from getting bloated.

From ActionController::Base documentation

ActiveRecord::SessionStore - Sessions are stored in your database, which works better than PStore with multiple app servers and, unlike CookieStore, hides your session contents from the user. To use ActiveRecord::SessionStore, set

config.action_controller.session_store = :active_record_store

in your config/environment.rb and run rake db:sessions:create.

So you should…

class UsersController < ApplicationController

  def new
    @user = session[:user] || User.new
  end

  def create
    @user = User.new(params[:user])

    if @user.save
      # clears previously stored user if there is any
      session[:user] = nil
      redirect_to '/'
    else
      session[:user] = @user
      redirect_to :action => :new
    end
  end
end
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I wonder why you think session is better than flash? flash clears out automatically after the next request which seems ideal to transport the parameters over to new. Is flash size the concern? – Aditya Sanghi May 9 '11 at 15:50
    
I agree with @Aditya, Session should be used when you need to store it in consequent requests. – kazimanzurrashid May 9 '11 at 19:10
    
I recommended using session because it can be stored in the database and you were complaining about a bloated cookie. If your model data is small and you don't mind storing it in the cookie, there is nothing wrong with using flash – edgerunner May 9 '11 at 21:36
    
1. I see no saving of actual errors to display :( 2. I prefer flash as the playframework does it perfectly there and it works great. session is really for long term storage where flash is for storing from return post response to get request so it's perfect as you don't need it longer than that and don't have to remember to clear the flash like you do the session(ie. less code) – Dean Hiller Mar 28 '14 at 22:06

It is true, though, that you should not do redirect_to '/'. You should define root in your routes file and then do redirect_to root_path.

Edit: Oops, that was supposed to be a comment to SpyrosP's answer.

Also: Here is some excellence guidance on flash. Particularly this may ease your mind:

The flash is a special part of the session which is cleared with each request. This means that values stored there will only be available in the next request, which is useful for storing error messages etc.

The interesting things there is that, yes it is a part of the session, so answers to "use the session instead of flash" are misguided, as Justin Etheredge's answer already put it. The other thing is that it says it is useful for storing messages instead of only for storing messages. With the added "etc" it would lead me to believe that it is within the intended usage to store user information in there as well.

One last thing, I would agree with Aditya Sanghi that you should just store the user parameters and not an entire user object in the flash.

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I didn't read the question properly.

The validation failure you have necessitates going to a different page where a different process will occur. You tried to update a domain object, it doesn't exist. The usual response to a validation failure is to re-render the page, but you need to go to the create page.

The flash hash seems wrong for this. I'd agree with the idea of stuffing your entered data into the session and redirecting.

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