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I've got C# code for creating a document, I want to write the same in C++/CLI.

private void HelloWorld(string documentFileName) 
{
    // Create a Wordprocessing document. 
    using (WordprocessingDocument myDoc =
           WordprocessingDocument.Create(documentFileName, 
               WordprocessingDocumentType.Document)) 
    { 
        // Add a new main document part. 
        MainDocumentPart mainPart = myDoc.AddMainDocumentPart(); 
        //Create Document tree for simple document. 
        mainPart.Document = new Document(); 
        //Create Body (this element contains
        //other elements that we want to include 
        Body body = new Body(); 
        //Create paragraph 
        Paragraph paragraph = new Paragraph(); 
        Run run_paragraph = new Run(); 
        // we want to put that text into the output document 
        Text text_paragraph = new Text("Hello World!"); 
        //Append elements appropriately. 
        run_paragraph.Append(text_paragraph); 
        paragraph.Append(run_paragraph); 
        body.Append(paragraph); 
        mainPart.Document.Append(body); 
        // Save changes to the main document part. 
        mainPart.Document.Save(); 
    } 
}

Also please suggest me any links where I can find C++/CLI example for OpenXML SDK

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a direct translation:

private:
    void HelloWorld(String^ documentFileName)
    {
        msclr::auto_handle<WordprocessingDocument> myDoc(
            WordprocessingDocument::Create(
                documentFileName, WordprocessingDocumentType::Document
            )
        );
        MainDocumentPart^ mainPart = myDoc->AddMainDocumentPart();
        mainPart->Document = gcnew Document;
        Body^ body = gcnew Body;
        Paragraph^ paragraph = gcnew Paragraph;
        Run^ run_paragraph = gcnew Run;
        Text^ text_paragraph = gcnew Text(L"Hello World!");
        run_paragraph->Append(text_paragraph);
        paragraph->Append(run_paragraph);
        body->Append(paragraph);
        mainPart->Document->Append(body);
        mainPart->Document->Save();
    }

msclr::auto_handle<> should generally be considered more idiomatic than try..finally, just as std::shared_ptr<> and std::unique_ptr<> are in C++.

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1  
+1 for teaching me about msclr::auto_handle –  sehe May 3 '11 at 7:11
    
@ildjarn -I'm getting the below error the above code is compiled -- error C2872: 'Text' : ambiguous symbol could be 'System::Text' –  Greenhorn May 3 '11 at 9:47
1  
@Greenhorn : Get rid of using namespace System; or fully qualify Text (or create a local typedef for the fully-qualified Text and use that instead); I don't know what namespace the objects you're working with here are in, so I don't know how to fully qualify them for you to give a concrete solution for that error. –  ildjarn May 3 '11 at 9:48
    
@ildjarn can you please suggest me any links where I can find C++/CLI example or tutorails on openXML SDK –  Greenhorn May 4 '11 at 9:04
    
@Greenhorn : I've never used OpenXML, I don't know anything about it. Sorry. –  ildjarn May 4 '11 at 17:11

I take it you have tried something? I don't have access to a compiler

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B/CLI should get you started.

If you wonder about translating the using construct (good question, had you asked it!), I suggest something along the following lines (note the try {} finally { delete ... } idom)

private:

void HelloWorld(String^ documentFileName) 
{ 
    // Create a Wordprocessing document. 
    WordprocessingDocument ^myDoc = WordprocessingDocument::Create(documentFileName, WordprocessingDocumentType::Document);
    try
    {
        // Add a new main document part. 
        MainDocumentPart mainPart = myDoc::AddMainDocumentPart(); 
        //Create Document tree for simple document. 
        mainPart->Document = gcnew Document(); 
        //Create Body (this element contains
        //other elements that we want to include 
        Body body = gcnew Body(); 
        //Create paragraph 
        Paragraph paragraph = gcnew Paragraph(); 
        Run run_paragraph = gcnew Run(); 
        // we want to put that text into the output document 
        Text text_paragraph = gcnew Text("Hello World!"); 
        //Append elements appropriately. 
        run_paragraph->Append(text_paragraph); 
        paragraph->Append(run_paragraph); 
        body->Append(paragraph); 
        mainPart->Document->Append(body); 
        // Save changes to the main document part. 
        mainPart->Document->Save(); 
    } finally
    {
        delete myDoc;
    }   
}

I want to repeat I have no compiler available at the moment, so it may be rough around the edges, but should provide some information nonetheless

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please use RAII instead of try - finally. –  Tobias Langner May 3 '11 at 7:05
    
@Tobias: you are missing the point. This is CLR, so RAII doesn't exist as such for managed (gc) types. Unless you explicitely call delete there is no deterministic disposal (let alone finalization) IIRC. But see @ildjam's post for a better way –  sehe May 3 '11 at 7:10
    
RAII absolutely exists for managed types, as long as all you expect is for Dispose to be called on the object rather than proper deterministic finalization. The fact that Dispose is implicitly called on an object declared with value (stack) semantics when it goes out of scope is precisely what makes msclr::auto_handle<> useful in the first place. –  ildjarn May 3 '11 at 7:28

The syntax is basically the same. "new" needs to be replaced by gcnew, the "." by -> (e.g. body.Append(paragraph) will be body->Append(paragraph). The tricky part will be the "using" directive. To do it the C++ way, you need some kind of smart pointer that "deletes" the object at the end of the block (with delete meaning calling the IDisposable interface) - this is called RAII.

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