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I have a class

public class Orders
{
    public Orders() {}

    private string _idOrder;
    private string _totalPrice;

    public string idOrder 
    { 
        get{ return _idOrder;}
        set { _idOrder = value;}  
    }

    public string totalPrice
    {
        get { return _totalPrice; }
        set { _totalPrice = value; }  
    }
}

I am loading the list from database like this

while (dr.Read())
{
    Orders.idOrder = dr["IdOrder"].ToString();
    Orders.totalPrice= dr["totalPrice"].ToString();
}

It's is showing me only last record. How can I load all the orders and retrieve them back by foreach loop?

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3  
where is the list? –  Marc Gravell May 3 '11 at 7:21
    
@Marc Gravell I am not aware how to create list in such type of scenerio. I am a beginner :-) –  Chris May 3 '11 at 7:24
    
yield return just collect your values and return it as a list.After yield return control will not exit from function –  Saleh May 3 '11 at 7:35
    
If you don't need Orders List for more than one time you better to use @Grook way. And If you need them u better to use @"Daniel Hilgarth" way. –  Saleh May 3 '11 at 8:00
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Create a list :-)

List<Order> orders = new List<Order>();
while (dr.Read())
{
    Order order = new Order();
    order.idOrder = dr["IdOrder"].ToString();
    order.totalPrice= dr["totalPrice"].ToString();
    orders.Add(order);
}

As you see, I renamed your class from Orders to Order, because that's what it really represents: One order. To have more orders, you need to put those single orders into a list.

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1  
you beat me into it :) +1 vote –  Alex R. May 3 '11 at 7:22
    
I've posted the same code, same thoughts ;) –  trampi May 3 '11 at 7:28
    
With the exception that your's won't compile ;-) –  Daniel Hilgarth May 3 '11 at 7:31
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It's only showing you the one item, because you're only changing properties on the one item, not instantiating a new one:

var results = new List<Order>();

while (reader.Read())
{
  var order = new Order
  {
    Id = (int)reader["IdOrder"],
    TotalPrice = (decimal)reader["totalPrice"]
  };

  results.Add(order);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Alas, but idOrder and TotalPrice are strings –  Alex R. May 3 '11 at 7:23
    
Very true, but I think he also needs to address type casing, member naming conventions and proper type use too ;-) –  Matthew Abbott May 3 '11 at 7:25
    
@Rakshit, I think Matt has a couple of good points here. Storing an integer Id (if it is an integer value?) in a string field is just plain ole inefficient.... AND Storing a Price (any monetary amount) in a string field is just plain WRONG! One thing computer do a LOT of is add-up money... so shouldn't Price be stored as a number? And decimal is a good choice for money values, because calculations on decimals produce accurate (or alteast predictable) results. –  corlettk May 3 '11 at 7:45
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I think you are looking for something like this:

IEnumberable<Order> FetchOrders()
{
    while(dr.Read())
        yield return new Order {
          idOrder=dr["IdOrder"].ToString(), 
          totalPrice=dr["totalPrice"].ToString()
        });
}
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It think your answer is near what he or she wants.+1 –  Saleh May 3 '11 at 7:27
    
@Grook I am little confused with the statement yield return –  Chris May 3 '11 at 7:30
    
@Grook: I think your answer is too complicated for a beginner. (no vote). –  Daniel Hilgarth May 3 '11 at 7:33
    
@Grook: I never would have thought of exposing it as an IEnumerable... that's actually pretty neat (especially memory-wise)... presuming that ONE forward-only iteration is all that's required in the ACTUAL processing... and if a List is actually required then it's childsplay to create one from an enumeration. I like it. Thanx for the fish. Cheers. Keith. –  corlettk May 3 '11 at 7:33
    
@Chris: You can read more about it here @DanielHilgarth: For beginner it is just usefull and comfortable way to solve this problem. And, maybe, he(she) will read about it and obtain this technique. –  Grook May 3 '11 at 7:48
show 2 more comments

That Orders class represents a single order! If what you need is a list of orders then I suggest you rename that class to Order, and then create a List<Order> (a list of order-objects) and populate that from your query results.

Also (forgive me for being pernickety) "idOrder" is not a good field name. The standard approaches are "orderId" or just plain old "Id" (ID, or even id). Likewise I would expect the price-of-ONE-order to be called just "amount", or even "price"... not "totalPrice"... it'll be too confusing when you come to total-up the totalPrices... get my drift?

Cheers. Keith.

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I'm Waaaaay Too Slow! Must be gettin old! ;-) –  corlettk May 3 '11 at 7:25
1  
+1 for description. I really need to understand as a beginner. –  Chris May 3 '11 at 7:27
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I don't see how that will compile. Orders.idOrder is not a static property, it's an instance property.

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It is compiling correctly and I am getting the output too. Am I doing anything incorrect? Advice me so that I can correct the logic –  Chris May 3 '11 at 7:26
    
How can you set Orders.idOrder when idOrder (and its backing member) is not declared static? –  Kevin Hsu May 3 '11 at 7:37
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If i understand you right you want to use something like this:

List<Order> = new List<Order>();
while (dr.Read())
{
    Order newOrder = new Order();
    newOrder.idOrder = dr["IdOrder"].ToString();
    newOrder.totalPrice= dr["totalPrice"].ToString();
    orderList.Add(newOrder);
}
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Notice this that I just discuss more for @Grook Answer. I Think it is so near to what to want.

IEnumberable<Order> FetchOrders()
{
    while(dr.Read())
        yield return new Order {
          idOrder=dr["IdOrder"].ToString(), 
          totalPrice=dr["totalPrice"].ToString()
        });
}

Then You can easily use foreach loop

Foreach(Order order in GetOrders())
{
 doSomething(order);
}

Is it clear?

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