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I have a simple problem. I have two libraries, one compiled in C, other compiled in C++, where the C library is linked and loaded by the C++ library. I need to declare a struct instance in the C library that both can read and write to. How do you accomplish this?

Thanks

EDIT: added that it's to be an instance of a struct, not just the declaration

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Libraries are not a communication mechanism. –  nbt May 3 '11 at 9:11
    
@unapersson He isn't using libraries as a 'communication mechanism'. He wants share data between libraries. Noting wrong with that. –  Andy Johnson May 3 '11 at 9:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to create a single header file which is included by modules in both the C and C++ libraries:

#ifndef YOURSTRUCT_H
#define YOURSTRUCT_H

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
    struct YourStruct
    {
        // your contents here
    };
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif
// UPDATE: declare an instance here:
extern YourStruct yourInstance;
#endif

This form of header file means that both compilers will be happy reading the header file and both will produce the same name mangling.

Update:
Then you need a module file. Just the one. Either a C file if it is to be included in your C library, or a C++ file if it is to be included in your c++ library:

#include "yourstruct.h"

YourStruct yourInstance;

Now any client of the global instance, whether it is a C client or a C++ client just has to #include "yourstruct.h" and reference yourInstance

Update:
As Matthieu points out you are better off passing pointers to instances around. eg.

#include "yourstruct.h"

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

void yourFunction(YourStruct* someInstance);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif
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2  
Mandatory Note: global variables are evil, consider passing parameters to functions instead. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '11 at 9:35
    
@Matthieu: Excellent point. I'll add that to my answer. –  quamrana May 3 '11 at 9:38

Use extern C linkage specification.

#ifdef __cplusplus 
extern "C" {
#endif 

    struct YourStruct
    {


    };
#ifdef __cplusplus 
}
#endif 
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Doesn't that just export the struct declaration? I want to share a struct instance, sorry if it wasn't clear –  KaiserJohaan May 3 '11 at 9:09
    
@KaiserJohaan: Yes, but the extern "C" block works the same way with declarations of instances and functions. –  Jan Hudec May 3 '11 at 9:14
1  
This isn't legal C code. –  Andy Johnson May 3 '11 at 9:33
    
@Andy Johnson: Thanks! Yes you are correct. A little hasty answer & I missed out on the macro gaurds. Made the modifications. –  Alok Save May 3 '11 at 12:26
extern struct YourStruct *yourstruct_instance;

In one of the headers should do the job.

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@quamrana beat me to it :) –  Joe Steeve May 3 '11 at 9:21

Export an instance of the struct from your c library. Have the C++ library include a header file from the c library.

In a .h file in the C library:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
__declspec(dllexport) struct MyStruct
{
    // members
}
extern __declspec(dllexport) struct MyStruct myInstance;
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

In a .c file in the C library:

__declspec(dllexport) struct MyStruct myInstance;

Your c and c++ code can then manipulate myInstance.

See this article for more info. Also, try creating a new C++ dll project and check the 'export symbols' box. This creates a c++ dll with an an exported class and instance of that class. Doing the same in c for an exported struct is very similar.

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