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I know that JRMP opens a new socket for every invocation request. Also that IIOP can share a single opened socket for multiple requests.

As stated by Wikipedia:

Usage of the term RMI may denote solely the programming interface or may signify both the API and JRMP, whereas the term RMI-IIOP (read: RMI over IIOP) denotes the RMI interface delegating most of the functionality to the supporting CORBA implementation.

One of the questions in my paper where I had to say whether the statement was true/false said:

RMI Servers share a single socket for multiple invocation requests.

At this point,there was ambiguity whether the question was probed considering it was a JRMP or an IIOP server. Is it safe for me to assume that if the questions states only RMI , then in that case it would imply it was a JRMP server and not an IIOP server?

I hope I've made myself clear.

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No, it's not safe to assume that. The question is ambiguous. –  skaffman May 3 '11 at 9:36
    
Also, have you considered the pooled RMI invoker used by JBoss? –  Mikaveli May 3 '11 at 10:53
    
@skaffman -- thank you. +1 –  Pavitar May 4 '11 at 3:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, RMI can share sockets or create them as needed depending on the RMI client implementation. Such a sweeping statement wouldn't be true.

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@Pavitar: But that answer is incorrect. It doesn't do that at all. –  EJP May 5 '11 at 0:07
    
Your answer states 'No [it won't share a socket]', and 'it will [my emphasis] create a new client socket for each request'. As you correctly state in your comment, this is implementation-dependent. So 'no' and 'will' are both incorrect. It could. But it won't. I've never seen an RMI/JRMP or RMI/IIOP (or RMI/JERI) implementation that does that, in 14 years –  EJP May 6 '11 at 5:06
    
And it depends on the RMI client implementation, not the server. –  EJP Jul 11 '11 at 8:27
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@Mikaveli RMI connection pooling is implemented at the client. That's the only place it can possibly be implemented. Think about it. Then if you disagree please provide your own reference. My reference is java.rmi: The Guide to Remote Method Invocation in Java, Pitt & McNiff, 2001, but then I did write it. –  EJP Jul 11 '11 at 9:58
    
community.jboss.org/wiki/Invokers The JRMP invoker makes a new client socket for each request it makes on the client to the server. –  Mikaveli Jul 11 '11 at 10:16

I know that JRMP opens a new socket for every invocation request.

No it doesn't. The RMI client uses connection pooling.

As stated by Wikipedia:

Usage of the term RMI may denote solely the programming interface or may signify both the API and JRMP, whereas the term RMI-IIOP (read: RMI over IIOP) denotes the RMI interface delegating most of the functionality to the supporting CORBA implementation.

I consider that statement misleading and I've corrected it. The new wording says that the term 'RMI' could refer to the API or any implementation, including JRMP, IIOP, JERI, JBoss Remoting, ..., whereas 'RMI-IIOP' specifically refers to RMI over IIOP.

RMI Servers share a single socket for multiple invocation requests.

The statement is ambiguous, misleading, and implementation-dependent.

Is it safe for me to assume that if the questions states only RMI , then in that case it would imply it was a JRMP server and not an IIOP server?

No. But in this case it doesn't make any difference.

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