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I have two string variables which contain dates in yyyy-mm-dd format as follows :

date1 = '2011-05-03'
date2 = '2011-05-10'

I want to write code that generates all dates in the range date1 to date2. How can this be done in Python ?

Please Help Thanks

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1  
duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/993358/… –  msalvadores May 3 '11 at 10:29
    
@msa Possibly, but not of that one. –  badp May 3 '11 at 10:37

5 Answers 5

from dateutil import rrule, parser

date1 = '2011-05-03'
date2 = '2011-05-10'

dates = list(rrule.rrule(rrule.DAILY,
                         dtstart=parser.parse(date1),
                         until=parser.parse(date2)))

print dates

Since dateutil is not a standard library, you will have to install it as a separate package. See the documentation for further details regarding the format (especially dayfirst and yearfirst switches).

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1  
Cool. How does the parser know if it's yyyy-mm-dd or yyyy-dd-mm? –  Tim Pietzcker May 3 '11 at 10:38
    
dateutil isn't part of a standard Pyton distribution; mind adding a link to your answer? –  badp May 3 '11 at 10:39
    
@Tim Pietzcker, @badp - thank you, answer updated. –  eumiro May 3 '11 at 10:53
import time

def dates_between(start, end):
  start_epoch = int(time.mktime(time.strptime(start, "%Y-%m-%d")))
  end_epoch = int(time.mktime(time.strptime(end, "%Y-%m-%d"))) + 1 #include end
  return range(start_epoch, end_epoch, 86400)
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This breaks for days that are not 86,400 epoch seconds long, but I'm no Jon Skeet-y enough to know if this assumption holds true "well enough". –  badp Sep 26 '11 at 7:42

Dates can be compared to each other just like numbers, and you can do date-related math with the datetime.timedelta object. There's no reason to use dateutil here, and there's no reason to hard-code the number of iterations a la 'range(9)'. This really becomes similar to how you'd deal with plain old numbers.

>>> import datetime
>>> date1 = '2011-05-03'
>>> date2 = '2011-05-10'
>>> start = datetime.datetime.strptime(date1, '%Y-%m-%d')
>>> end = datetime.datetime.strptime(date2, '%Y-%m-%d')
>>> step = datetime.timedelta(days=1)
>>> while start <= end:
...     print start.date()
...     start += step
... 
2011-05-03
2011-05-04
2011-05-05
2011-05-06
2011-05-07
2011-05-08
2011-05-09
2011-05-10
>>> 
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import datetime
real_date1 = datetime.date(*[int(x) for x in date1.split('-')])
real_date2 = datetime.date(*[int(x) for x in date2.split('-')])
date_range =  real_date2 - real_date1
dates = list()
for days in xrange(date_range.days):
    dates.append(real_date1 + datetime.timedelta(days))

print dates
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>>> for a in range(9):
...     print(datetime.date(2011, 05, 03) + datetime.timedelta(a))
...
2011-05-03
2011-05-04
2011-05-05
2011-05-06
2011-05-07
2011-05-08
2011-05-09
2011-05-10
2011-05-11

I'm not too sure whether the parsing of the strings was integral or just the way you started the question. If so, please disregard the answer as oversimplified

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