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I have the following simple script on a page

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head>
    <title>Untitled Page</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var nsTest = function ()
        {
            var test = function ()
            {
                alert('nsTest.test');
            }

            var test2 = function ()
            {
                alert('nsTest.test2');
            }

            return {
                test: test,
                test2: test2
            }
        } ();

        function t()
        {
            alert(nsTest.test());
        }

        function t2()
        {
            alert(nsTest.test2());
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <input type="button" value="test" onclick="t()" />
    <input type="button" value="test2" onclick="t2()" />
</body>
</html>

When I click on either of the buttons I see the expected alert on the screent and then a second alert that says 'undefined'.

This is happening in IE8 and FF3. Any ideas what is going on?

Thanks,

David

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your saying alert twice. You do not need to say

alert(nsTest.test2());

you just need to call nsTest.test2();

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head>
    <title>Untitled Page</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var nsTest = function ()
        {
            var test = function ()
            {
                alert('nsTest.test');
            }

            var test2 = function ()
            {
                alert('nsTest.test2');
            }

            return {
                test: test,
                test2: test2
            }
        }();

        function t()
        {
            nsTest.test();
        }

        function t2()
        {
            nsTest.test2();
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <input type="button" value="test" onclick="t()" />
    <input type="button" value="test2" onclick="t2()" />
</body>
</html>

Actually you do not even need a function t1 and t2 you can just have your onclick reference nsTest.test2() directly as shown here http://jsbin.com/ageva5/2/edit

share|improve this answer
    
How stupid do I feel now? So obvious when it's pointed out! Thanks Daveo – dlarkin77 May 3 '11 at 10:56

You call t() which calls nsTest.test()

nsTest.test() alerts the string 'nsTest.test' and then has no return value so returns undefined.

t() then receives the return value and alerts it.

share|improve this answer

First the alerts in nsTest are run then the alerts in t() and t2() are run. These alerts alert the return value of nsTest.*. These value are undefined. Remove these alerts to only get the first alert.

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