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I'm using a map in php like so:

function func($v) {
    return $v * 2;
}

$values = array(4, 6, 3);
$mapped = array_map(func, $values);
var_dump($mapped);

Is it possible to get the index of the value in the function?

Also - if I'm writing code that needs the index, should I be using a for loop instead of a map?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Sure you can, with the help of array_keys():

function func($v, $k) {
    // key is now $k
    return $v * 2;
}

$values = array(4, 6, 3);
$mapped = array_map(func, $values, array_keys($values));
var_dump($mapped);
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, thanks. –  Ollie Glass May 3 '11 at 11:05
8  
Cool answer, didn't realise you could pass extra params into an array_map()ped method. Learn something new every day! –  GordonM May 3 '11 at 11:11
    
@Gordon yeah you can supply array_map() with an arbitrary number of arguments :) –  Aron Rotteveel May 3 '11 at 11:17
    
Too bad it doesn't work for associative arrays. –  Pang Sep 10 '14 at 10:09

When mapping an anonymous function over an anonymous array, there is no way to access the keys:

array_map(
    function($val) use ($foo) { /* ... */ },
    array(key1 => val1,
          key2 => val2,
          /* ... */));

array_reduce doesn't get access to the keys either. array_walk can access keys, but the array is passed by reference, which requires a layer of indirection.

Some solutions are:

Array of pairs

This is bad, since we're changing the original array. Plus the boilerplate "array()" calls increase linearly with the length of the array:

array_map(
    function($pair) use ($foo) {
        list($key, $val) = $pair;
        /* ... */
    },
    array(array(key1, val1),
          array(key2, val2),
          /* ... */));

Temporary variable

We're acting on the original array, and the boilerplate is constant, but we can easily clobber an existing variable:

$i_hope_this_does_not_conflict = array(key1 => val1,
                                       key2 => val2,
                                       /* ... */);
array_map(
    function($key, $val) use ($foo) { /* ... */ },
    array_keys($i_hope_this_does_not_conflict),
    $i_hope_this_does_not_conflict);
unset($i_hope_this_does_not_conflict);

One-shot function

We can use function scope to prevent clobbering existing names, but have to add an extra layer of "use":

call_user_func(
    function($arr) use ($foo) {
        return array_map(function($key, $val) use ($foo) { /* ... */ },
                         array_keys($arr),
                         $arr);
    },
    array(key1 => val1,
          key2 => val2,
          /* ... */));

Multi-argument one-shot function

We define the function we're mapping in the original scope to prevent the "use" boilerplate):

call_user_func(
    function($f, $arr) {
        return array_map($f, array_keys($arr), $arr);
    },
    function($key, $val) use ($foo) { /* ... */ },
    array(key1 => val1,
          key2 => val2,
          /* ... */));

New function

The interesting thing to note is that our last one-shot function has a nice, generic signature and looks a lot like array_map. We might want to give this a name and re-use it:

function array_mapk($f, $arr) {
    return array_map($f, array_keys($arr), $arr);
}

Our application code then becomes:

array_mapk(
    function($key, $val) use ($foo) { /* ... */ },
    array(key1 => val1,
          key2 => val2,
          /* ... */));

Indirect Array Walk

When writing the above I'd ignored array_walk since it requires its argument to be passed by reference; however, I've since realised that it's easy to work around this using call_user_func. I think this is the best version so far:

call_user_func(
    'array_walk',
    array(key1 => val1,
          key2 => val2,
          /* ... */),
    function($val, $key) use ($foo) { /* ... */ });
share|improve this answer

You are missing a parameter in Dropdown class. I think it's better like that :

public function options()
{
    $value = $this->value;

    $mapped = array_map(function($k, $v) use ($value) {
     return array(
        'value'    => $k,
        'display'  => $v,
        'selected' => ($value === $k),
      );
    },  array_keys($this->options), $this->options);

    return $mapped;
}
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