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I have found on the Internet an article which presents how to implement repository pattern. The implementation looks similar like here:

class ProductRepository : IProductRepository
{

    var context;
    public ProductRepository() {
        this.context = new MyDataBaseDataContext(); 
    }
    // the rest of methods
}

But Im not quite sure is this right, what is happened with context? Is the Garbage Collector dispose this object? Or better should I create context with using (...) { } statement?

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1  
This seems perfectly valid to me. If your repository class owns a disposable data context, it should also be disposable itself (in line with the guideline that any class that has a disposable members should also implement IDisposable). –  MattDavey May 3 '11 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

Repository should not open a data context, DataContext must be passed to it - since it must not own it. Let's say you have an operation which needs to be in a transaction and involves multiple repositories, what would you do?

You need to use UnitOfWork pattern.

In this pattern, a UoW (which wraps a DataContext) is passed to a repository.

Practically, ProductManager in Business layer creates a Unit Of Work.

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Why must a repository not own a data context? I agree UOW is a nice design but the wording of your answer implies that it's an difinitive rule, when there are many equally valid approaches... –  MattDavey May 4 '11 at 7:49
    
Because it can have no idea what the lifetime of the DataContext should be. For example, in web scenarios, data context is created per request and this is not the kind of knowledge a repository must have. –  Aliostad May 4 '11 at 8:19
    
Unless the lifetime of the data context should be the same as the lifetime of the repository itself, in which case having the repository take repsonsibility for managing the lifetime of its own dependency is entirely reasonable. It is not true that a data context is created per request in web scenarios, a data context can be as long or short lived as you require, it is not tied to the web request at all. –  MattDavey May 4 '11 at 9:38

The simple answer to this question is that the repository should be sure to dispose the data context itself, rather than letting it be finalized by the .NET runtime. This can be achieved by following the standard .NET dispose pattern...

class ProductRepository : IProductRepository, IDisposable
{
    var context;

    public ProductRepository() {
        this.context = new MyDataBaseDataContext(); 
    }

    // the rest of methods

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (context != null)
        {
            context.Dispose();
            context = null;
        }
    }
}
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I guess it depends on whether you need transactions across repository operations and your need for tracking changes. The data datacontext can be immensely helpful since it can let you retrieve a bunch of objects, modify them in the application and then simply call SubmitChanges /RollbackChanges at any time you see fit. But if you don't expose this functionality in your repository you are probably better off by just "using" an instance in each repository method since this will preserve memory usage and resources for tracking changes.

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