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I'd normally do this in C# but since I've got to get this code in this particular assembly which is a vb.net one, I'm stuck.

Here's my linq query:

Dim i As Integer = 0

Dim oldAndCurrentIntersectionOnNames = From currentApplicant In currentApplicants _
                                    Group Join oldApplicant In oldApplicants _
                                        On _
                                        New With {Key .FirstName = currentApplicant.FirstName, _
                                                    Key .LastName = currentApplicant.LastName} _
                                            Equals _
                                        New With {Key .FirstName = oldApplicant.FirstName, _
                                                    Key .LastName = oldApplicant.LastName} Into applicants = Group _
                                    From applicant In applicants.DefaultIfEmpty(New ApplicantNameDetails()) _
                                    Select New ApplicantNameDetails() With _
                                    { _
                                        .Index = i+=1, _
                                        .FirstName = CStr(IIf(Not currentApplicant.FirstName Is Nothing, currentApplicant.FirstName, Nothing)), _
                                        .OldFirstName = CStr(IIf(Not applicant.FirstName Is Nothing, applicant.FirstName, Nothing)), _
                                        .LastName = CStr(IIf(Not currentApplicant.LastName Is Nothing, currentApplicant.LastName, Nothing)), _
                                        .OldLastName = CStr(IIf(Not applicant.LastName Is Nothing, applicant.LastName, Nothing)) _
                                    }

You'll see the .Index = i+=1

This was my attempt to do what I'd quite happily do in C# (i.e. Index = i++) in VB. Unfortunately the VB compiler doesn't like that.

Has anybody got any suggestions as to how I'd do this in VB.

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is an overload of the Select method that lets you use the index of the item on the result collection. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534869.aspx

You could split your query in two parts to use it (untested)

Dim q = From currentApplicant In currentApplicants _
        Group Join oldApplicant In oldApplicants On _
                   New With {Key.FirstName = currentApplicant.FirstName, _
                             Key.LastName = currentApplicant.LastName} _
                   Equals _
                   New With {Key.FirstName = oldApplicant.FirstName, _
                             Key.LastName = oldApplicant.LastName} Into applicants = Group _
        From applicant In applicants.DefaultIfEmpty(New ApplicantNameDetails())


Dim oldAndCurrentIntersectionOnNames = _
q.Select(Function(x, i) New ApplicantNameDetails() With _
         { _
             .Index = i, _
             .FirstName = CStr(IIf(Not x.currentApplicant.FirstName Is Nothing, x.currentApplicant.FirstName, Nothing)), _
             .OldFirstName = CStr(IIf(Not x.applicant.FirstName Is Nothing, x.applicant.FirstName, Nothing)), _
             .LastName = CStr(IIf(Not x.currentApplicant.LastName Is Nothing, x.currentApplicant.LastName, Nothing)), _
             .OldLastName = CStr(IIf(Not x.applicant.LastName Is Nothing, x.applicant.LastName, Nothing)) _
         })         
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Doh! 'Must...get...it...to...work...in...one...monolithic...query' Talk about getting tunnel vision and ignoring divide and conquer! That worked a treat, big thanks! (the Select is missing a closing parenthesis btw) –  Weevie May 4 '11 at 8:39
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Essentially, you can’t. If you want the Linq query to get consecutive values, use a special (so-called “generator”) class that has an IncrementAndGet (or simply Next) method for your integer.

class IntegerGenerator
    private state as integer = 0

    public function Next() as integer
        dim oldState = state
        state += 1
        return oldState
    end function
end class
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Just had a look at generator classes in relation to linq and I only see them in relation to linq to sql. This query is a linq to objects query and so I'm wondering if your comment holds. Could you let me know in the context of linq why I shouldn't create the index in the fly usingthe increment operator in C# (or however you one would do it in VB. –  Weevie May 3 '11 at 15:52
    
@Weevie Sorry, confusing terminology. The generator classes in the context of Linq to SQL are completely different. In general, a “generator” is simply any construct that produces successive values. For example a random number generator. –  Konrad Rudolph May 3 '11 at 15:56
    
Could you give a bit more detail about why I shouldn't use the method I've appeared to use successfully in C# with linq to objects on a couple of occasions? –  Weevie May 3 '11 at 15:56
    
@Weevie Sorry, ignore that comment (I’ll remove it). The first version of my answer looked a bit different: essentially, your Linq query shouldn’t change the function’s local state (i.e. it shouldn’t have side-effects). However, for the purpose of generating successive indexes this rule needs to be broken anyway so there’s nothing wrong with using ++ in C# here. –  Konrad Rudolph May 3 '11 at 16:01
    
If I'm projecting over a new type am I mutating anything? I figure I'm returning a new instance (the original sequences being IEnumerable and not amenable to changing anyway) or am I missing your point? I bet I am! –  Weevie May 3 '11 at 16:10
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