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I created a tetris game where you can restart after a game over. I implemented this quick and dirty with a goto (see code). The Game class relies on destructors, are these called with these goto's? How bad is this goto, is it acceptable, or what should I do instead?

int APIENTRY WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) {
    // initiate sdl
    sdl_init();

    // seed rng
    srand(time(NULL));

    newgame: // new game label
    Game game(GAME_WIDTH, GAME_HEIGHT, 1, screen);

    // keydowns
    bool fastfall = false;
    bool gamerunning = true;
    Uint32 lastupdate = 0;

    while (gamerunning && game.isalive()) {
        // game running stuff here
    }

    // game over stuff here

    while (gamerunning) {
        if (SDL_PollEvent(&event)) {
            if (event.type == SDL_QUIT) {
                gamerunning = false;
            } else if (event.type == SDL_KEYDOWN) {
                if (event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_r) goto newgame; // yay a new game!
            }
        }
    }

    TTF_Quit();
    SDL_Quit();
    return 0;
}
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4  
ewww... if it only was for the goto –  Alexandre C. May 3 '11 at 16:18
4  
Of course you can use a goto, if you can live with the consequences: xkcd.com/292 –  bitmask May 3 '11 at 16:37
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7 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

To answer the question about destructors no one else seems to have covered. According to 6.6/2 the destructors will be called for you. Quote:

On exit from a scope (however accomplished), destructors (12.4) are called for all constructed objects with automatic storage duration (3.7.2) (named objects or temporaries) that are declared in that scope, in the reverse order of their declaration. Transfer out of a loop, out of a block, or back past an initialized variable with automatic storage duration involves the destruction of variables with automatic storage duration that are in scope at the point transferred from but not at the point transferred to.

However I still don't suggest goto in this case at all. It doesn't clearly (to me anyway) indicate what's happening. You should just use a while loop and have it operate on the conditions instead.

Even something as simple as this should be more clear (although there's probably a way to rewrite it without the inner break). It's perfectly obvious that the locals are cleaned up used inside a while loop like this:

int APIENTRY WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) {
    // initiate sdl
    sdl_init();

    // seed rng
    srand(time(NULL));

    bool gamerunning = true;
    while(gamerunning)
    {
        Game game(GAME_WIDTH, GAME_HEIGHT, 1, screen);

        // keydowns
        bool fastfall = false;
        Uint32 lastupdate = 0;

        while (gamerunning && game.isalive()) {
            // game running stuff here
        }

        // game over stuff here

        while (gamerunning) {
            if (SDL_PollEvent(&event)) {
                if (event.type == SDL_QUIT) {
                    gamerunning = false;
                } else if (event.type == SDL_KEYDOWN) {
                    if (event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_r) break; // yay a new game - get out of the "what to do next" loop.
                }
            }
        }
    }

    TTF_Quit();
    SDL_Quit();
    return 0;
}
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2  
+1 for the quote answering the destructor question (which I managed to miss completely...) –  Oli Charlesworth May 3 '11 at 17:06
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There are some good times to use goto (eg: Implementing a state machine), but I'm not sure this is really one of them.

If it were me, I'd put the "game" code in a subroutine, exit out of it when done, and then let the higher-level routine chose to start a new game or something.

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Instead of a goto you can put everything from your newgame tag to the end of the while loop in a function. This function's return value would tell you if you have to run again. So it would be something like:

...
srand(time(NULL));

while (runGame())
{
}

TTF_Quit();
...

You would have to pass runGame() any parameters from your main function that you use in your game code and return a 1 where the code uses the goto and a zero when it is the last game.

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Break the significant blocks up into functions and then rather than calling goto, just call a function instead.

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int APIENTRY WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) {
    // initiate sdl
    sdl_init();

    // seed rng
    srand(time(NULL));


    while (1) { 
    Game game(GAME_WIDTH, GAME_HEIGHT, 1, screen);

    // keydowns
    bool fastfall = false;
    bool gamerunning = true;
    Uint32 lastupdate = 0;

    while (gamerunning && game.isalive()) {
        // game running stuff here
    }

    // game over stuff here
    restart_game = false; 
    while (gamerunning) {
        if (SDL_PollEvent(&event)) {
            if (event.type == SDL_QUIT) {
                gamerunning = false;
            } else if (event.type == SDL_KEYDOWN) {
                if (event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_r) { 
                      restart_game = true; break; 
                } 
            }
        }
    }
    if (!restart_game) break; 
    }

    TTF_Quit();
    SDL_Quit();
    return 0;
}
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This is even worse. Breaks, continue and goto are all "evil" the same way. –  Alexandre C. May 3 '11 at 16:23
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Gotos are rarely good to use. The exception seems to be for cleanup, where you need to quickly break out of many nested loops, free up some memory and exit. This here can easily be replaced with a while loop. If left as is it will only make debugging and maintenance harder.

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You could easily avoid this by putting the majority of this function in a while loop, and setting a flag to break out of it.

In C, the only real "acceptable" use of goto was for jumping to common clean-up code in the case of errors. In C++, you can avoid even this with exceptions. So really, there's no excuse!

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I know, but this feels really out of place, a goto seems more appropriate. That's why I want to know if this goto is acceptable. –  nightcracker May 3 '11 at 16:18
1  
@night: Why does a loop seem more out of place than a quick-and-dirty goto? You loop over games, until you no longer want to play games. That seems entirely natural to me... –  Oli Charlesworth May 3 '11 at 16:20
    
Because a restart seems to imply we're going back to the beginning of the code, which is exactly what a goto does. –  nightcracker May 3 '11 at 16:21
    
@nightcracker: no it is not. The 3 levels of if are not either. The event global variable is also weird. –  Alexandre C. May 3 '11 at 16:22
    
@night: You achieve exactly the same effect with a loop, and it's cleaner (because it's structural). –  Oli Charlesworth May 3 '11 at 16:23
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