Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I understand the need for virtual inheritance when using multiple inheritance -- it solves the Dreaded Diamond Problem.

But what if I'm not using multiple inheritance? Is there a need for virtual inheritance at all?

I seem to recall hearing that it was important for exceptions (throw a derived class, catch by base class reference). But shouldn't virtual destructors be sufficient for that?

I've tried searching for the reference page I once saw on this, but I can't seem to find it.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You're probably thinking about this Boost.Exception guideline, which I'll copy here for completeness:


Using Virtual Inheritance in Exception Types

Exception types should use virtual inheritance when deriving from other exception types. This insight is due to Andrew Koenig. Using virtual inheritance prevents ambiguity problems in the exception handler:

#include <iostream>
struct my_exc1 : std::exception { char const* what() const throw(); };
struct my_exc2 : std::exception { char const* what() const throw(); };
struct your_exc3 : my_exc1, my_exc2 {};

int
main()
    {
    try { throw your_exc3(); }
    catch(std::exception const& e) {}
    catch(...) { std::cout << "whoops!" << std::endl; }
    }

The program above outputs "whoops!" because the conversion to std::exception is ambiguous.

The overhead introduced by virtual inheritance is always negligible in the context of exception handling. Note that virtual bases are initialized directly by the constructor of the most-derived-type (the type passed to the throw statement, in case of exceptions.) However, typically this detail is of no concern when boost::exception is used, because it enables exception types to be trivial structs with no members (there's nothing to initialize.) See Exception Types as Simple Semantic Tags.

share|improve this answer
    
Useful info, but this still only applies if you use Multiple Inheritance (which you would for the Semantic Tags approach). But in the absence of MI... no point for virtual? –  Tim May 3 '11 at 19:37
    
@Tim: Right. Single-inheritance without virtual is exactly the same, exception-wise, as single-inheritance with virtual. –  GManNickG May 3 '11 at 19:41

No, it isn't needed except to resolve the diamond problem. You must be imagining things!

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, wouldn't be the first time ;-) –  Tim May 3 '11 at 19:37

Yes if your exception classes involve multiple inheritance.

share|improve this answer

The only cost of virtual inheritance is the vtable which is not much of a cost. Using virtual inheritance means that later after people inherit from various things that the double diamond problem won't unexpectedly rear their ugly head. It just means that your class will make a good base class.

share|improve this answer

I understand the need for virtual inheritance when using multiple inheritance -- it solves the Dreaded Diamond Problem.

But what if I'm not using multiple inheritance?

Question (mostly rhetorical): How would you know that MI won't ever be used?

Answer: You can't know that. (Until you prove you do.)

I seem to recall hearing that it was important for exceptions (throw a derived class, catch by base class reference). But shouldn't virtual destructors be sufficient for that?

Question (rhetorical): Why would a virtual destructor be necessary here?

Answer: It isn't.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not an answer. –  atoMerz Apr 14 '14 at 15:47
    
Actually, it is an answer. With a question mark, which is a taboo on SO. –  curiousguy Apr 15 '14 at 1:00
    
@atoMerz Reworded answer. –  curiousguy Oct 24 '14 at 15:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.