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I want an implementation of List<T> as a property which can be used thread-safely without any doubt.

Something like this:

private List<T> _list;

private List<T> MyT
{
    get { // return a copy of _list; }
    set { _list = value; }
}

It seems still I need to return a copy (cloned) of collection so if somewhere we are iterating the collection and at the same time the collection is set, then no exception is raised.

How to implement a thread-safe collection property?

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1  
use locks, that should do it. –  atoMerz May 3 '11 at 19:05
    
Can use use a thread-safe implementation of IList<T> (vs List<T>)? –  Greg May 3 '11 at 19:13
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8 Answers

up vote 46 down vote accepted

If you are targetting .Net 4 there are a few options in System.Collections.Concurrent Namespace

You could use ConcurrentBag<T> in this case instead of List<T>

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This was the answer for me, thanks! –  Jason More Jan 20 '12 at 19:37
2  
Like List<T> and unlike Dictionary, ConcurrentBag accepts duplicates. –  The Light May 24 '12 at 9:17
6  
ConcurrentBag is unordered collection, so unlike List<T> it does not guarantee ordering. Also you cannot access items by index. –  Radek Stromský Mar 7 '13 at 13:56
1  
@RadekStromský is right, and in the case you wanna an ordered concurrent list, you could try ConcurrentQueue (FIFO) or ConcurrentStack (LIFO). –  CaioToOn Dec 30 '13 at 21:14
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I would think making a sample ThreadSafeList class would be easy:

public class ThreadSafeList<T> : IList<T>
{
    protected List<T> _interalList = new List<T>();

    // Other Elements of IList implementation

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return Clone().GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return Clone().GetEnumerator();
    }

    protected static object _lock = new object();

    public List<T> Clone()
    {
        List<T> newList = new List<T>();

        lock (_lock)
        {
            _interalList.ForEach(x => newList.Add(x));
        }

        return newList;
    }
}

You simply clone the list before requesting an enumerator, and thus any enumeration is working off a copy that can't be modified while running.

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1  
Isn't this a shallow clone? If T is a reference type, won't this just return a new list containing references to all the original objects? If that is the case, this approach could still cause threading trouble since the list objects could be accessed by multiple threads through different "copies" of the list. –  Joel B Jan 2 '13 at 22:09
1  
Correct, it is a shallow copy. The point was to simply have a cloned set that would be safe to iterate over (so newList does not have any items added or removed which would invalidate the enumerator). –  Tejs Jan 3 '13 at 18:47
    
Roger that. This is a really elegant solution to this problem. After some serious thinking/Googl-ing I haven't really turned up anything else that comes close to this in terms of balancing safety/simplicity. Thanks for posting this! –  Joel B Jan 3 '13 at 20:02
2  
Should the _lock be static? –  Mike Ward Nov 18 '13 at 16:43
1  
@MikeWard - I don't think it should be, all instance will lock when any instance is being cloned! –  Josh M. Jan 16 at 13:09
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Even as it got the most votes, one usually can't take System.Collections.Concurrent.ConcurrentBag<T> as a thread-safe replacement for System.Collections.Generic.List<T> as it is (Radek Stromský already pointed it out) not ordered.

But there is a class called System.Collections.Generic.SynchronizedCollection<T> that is already since .NET 3.0 part of the framework, but it is that well hidden in a location where one does not expect it that it is little known and probably you have never ever stumbled over it (at least I never did).

SynchronizedCollection<T> is compiled into assembly System.ServiceModel.dll (which is part of the client profile but not of the portable class library).

Hope that helps.

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Good hint. Still portability matters much. –  Xaqron May 4 '13 at 9:42
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Basically if you want to enumerate safely, you need to use lock.

Please refer to MSDN on this. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx

Here is part of MSDN that you might be interested:

Public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

A List can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with one or more write accesses, the only way to ensure thread safety is to lock the collection during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization.

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Here is the class you asked for:

namespace AI.Collections {
    using System;
    using System.Collections;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Runtime.Serialization;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;
    using System.Threading.Tasks.Dataflow;

    /// <summary>
    ///     Just a simple thread safe collection.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <value>Version 1.5</value>
    /// <remarks>TODO replace locks with AsyncLocks</remarks>
    [DataContract( IsReference = true )]
    public class ThreadSafeList<T> : IList<T> {
        /// <summary>
        ///     TODO replace the locks with a ReaderWriterLockSlim
        /// </summary>
        [DataMember]
        private readonly List<T> _items = new List<T>();

        public ThreadSafeList( IEnumerable<T> items = null ) { this.Add( items ); }

        public long LongCount {
            get {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    return this._items.LongCount();
                }
            }
        }

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() { return this.Clone().GetEnumerator(); }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return this.GetEnumerator(); }

        public void Add( T item ) {
            if ( Equals( default( T ), item ) ) {
                return;
            }
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.Add( item );
            }
        }

        public Boolean TryAdd( T item ) {
            try {
                if ( Equals( default( T ), item ) ) {
                    return false;
                }
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    this._items.Add( item );
                    return true;
                }
            }
            catch ( NullReferenceException ) { }
            catch ( ObjectDisposedException ) { }
            catch ( ArgumentNullException ) { }
            catch ( ArgumentOutOfRangeException ) { }
            catch ( ArgumentException ) { }
            return false;
        }

        public void Clear() {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.Clear();
            }
        }

        public bool Contains( T item ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                return this._items.Contains( item );
            }
        }

        public void CopyTo( T[] array, int arrayIndex ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.CopyTo( array, arrayIndex );
            }
        }

        public bool Remove( T item ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                return this._items.Remove( item );
            }
        }

        public int Count {
            get {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    return this._items.Count;
                }
            }
        }

        public bool IsReadOnly { get { return false; } }

        public int IndexOf( T item ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                return this._items.IndexOf( item );
            }
        }

        public void Insert( int index, T item ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.Insert( index, item );
            }
        }

        public void RemoveAt( int index ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.RemoveAt( index );
            }
        }

        public T this[ int index ] {
            get {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    return this._items[ index ];
                }
            }
            set {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    this._items[ index ] = value;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Add in an enumerable of items.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="collection"></param>
        /// <param name="asParallel"></param>
        public void Add( IEnumerable<T> collection, Boolean asParallel = true ) {
            if ( collection == null ) {
                return;
            }
            lock ( this._items ) {
                this._items.AddRange( asParallel
                                              ? collection.AsParallel().Where( arg => !Equals( default( T ), arg ) )
                                              : collection.Where( arg => !Equals( default( T ), arg ) ) );
            }
        }

        public Task AddAsync( T item ) {
            return Task.Factory.StartNew( () => { this.TryAdd( item ); } );
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Add in an enumerable of items.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="collection"></param>
        public Task AddAsync( IEnumerable<T> collection ) {
            if ( collection == null ) {
                throw new ArgumentNullException( "collection" );
            }

            var produce = new TransformBlock<T, T>( item => item, new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = Environment.ProcessorCount } );

            var consume = new ActionBlock<T>( action: async obj => await this.AddAsync( obj ), dataflowBlockOptions: new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = Environment.ProcessorCount } );
            produce.LinkTo( consume );

            return Task.Factory.StartNew( async () => {
                collection.AsParallel().ForAll( item => produce.SendAsync( item ) );
                produce.Complete();
                await consume.Completion;
            } );
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Returns a new copy of all items in the <see cref="List{T}" />.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public List<T> Clone( Boolean asParallel = true ) {
            lock ( this._items ) {
                return asParallel
                               ? new List<T>( this._items.AsParallel() )
                               : new List<T>( this._items );
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Perform the <paramref name="action" /> on each item in the list.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="action">
        ///     <paramref name="action" /> to perform on each item.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="performActionOnClones">
        ///     If true, the <paramref name="action" /> will be performed on a <see cref="Clone" /> of the items.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="asParallel">
        ///     Use the <see cref="ParallelQuery{TSource}" /> method.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="inParallel">
        ///     Use the
        ///     <see
        ///         cref="Parallel.ForEach{TSource}(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable{TSource},System.Action{TSource})" />
        ///     method.
        /// </param>
        public void ForEach( Action<T> action, Boolean performActionOnClones = true, Boolean asParallel = true, Boolean inParallel = false ) {
            if ( action == null ) {
                throw new ArgumentNullException( "action" );
            }
            var wrapper = new Action<T>( obj => {
                try {
                    action( obj );
                }
                catch ( ArgumentNullException ) {
                    //if a null gets into the list then swallow an ArgumentNullException so we can continue adding
                }
            } );
            if ( performActionOnClones ) {
                var clones = this.Clone( asParallel: asParallel );
                if ( asParallel ) {
                    clones.AsParallel().ForAll( wrapper );
                }
                else if ( inParallel ) {
                    Parallel.ForEach( clones, wrapper );
                }
                else {
                    clones.ForEach( wrapper );
                }
            }
            else {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    if ( asParallel ) {
                        this._items.AsParallel().ForAll( wrapper );
                    }
                    else if ( inParallel ) {
                        Parallel.ForEach( this._items, wrapper );
                    }
                    else {
                        this._items.ForEach( wrapper );
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Perform the <paramref name="action" /> on each item in the list.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="action">
        ///     <paramref name="action" /> to perform on each item.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="performActionOnClones">
        ///     If true, the <paramref name="action" /> will be performed on a <see cref="Clone" /> of the items.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="asParallel">
        ///     Use the <see cref="ParallelQuery{TSource}" /> method.
        /// </param>
        /// <param name="inParallel">
        ///     Use the
        ///     <see
        ///         cref="Parallel.ForEach{TSource}(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable{TSource},System.Action{TSource})" />
        ///     method.
        /// </param>
        public void ForAll( Action<T> action, Boolean performActionOnClones = true, Boolean asParallel = true, Boolean inParallel = false ) {
            if ( action == null ) {
                throw new ArgumentNullException( "action" );
            }
            var wrapper = new Action<T>( obj => {
                try {
                    action( obj );
                }
                catch ( ArgumentNullException ) {
                    //if a null gets into the list then swallow an ArgumentNullException so we can continue adding
                }
            } );
            if ( performActionOnClones ) {
                var clones = this.Clone( asParallel: asParallel );
                if ( asParallel ) {
                    clones.AsParallel().ForAll( wrapper );
                }
                else if ( inParallel ) {
                    Parallel.ForEach( clones, wrapper );
                }
                else {
                    clones.ForEach( wrapper );
                }
            }
            else {
                lock ( this._items ) {
                    if ( asParallel ) {
                        this._items.AsParallel().ForAll( wrapper );
                    }
                    else if ( inParallel ) {
                        Parallel.ForEach( this._items, wrapper );
                    }
                    else {
                        this._items.ForEach( wrapper );
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
post the actual code –  Cole Johnson Dec 22 '12 at 22:55
    
The version on Google Drive gets updated as I update the class. uberscraper.blogspot.com/2012/12/c-thread-safe-list.html –  R H Dec 28 '12 at 12:32
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I believe _list.ToList() will make you a copy. You can also query it if you need to such as :

_list.Select("query here").ToList();

Anyways, msdn says this is indeed a copy and not simply a reference. Oh, and yes, you will need to lock in the set method as the others have pointed out.

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You can also use the more primitive

Monitor.Enter(lock);
Monitor.Exit(lock);

which lock uses (see this post C# Locking an object that is reassigned in lock block).

If you are expecting exceptions in the code this is not safe but it allows you to do something like the following:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
using System.Linq;

public class Something
{
    private readonly object _lock;
    private readonly List<string> _contents;

    public Something()
    {
        _lock = new object();

        _contents = new List<string>();
    }

    public Modifier StartModifying()
    {
        return new Modifier(this);
    }

    public class Modifier : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly Something _thing;

        public Modifier(Something thing)
        {
            _thing = thing;

            Monitor.Enter(Lock);
        }

        public void OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations(string input)
        {
            DoSomethingWith(input);
        }

        private void DoSomethingWith(string input)
        {
            Contents.Add(input);
        }

        private List<string> Contents
        {
            get { return _thing._contents; }
        }

        private object Lock
        {
            get { return _thing._lock; }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Monitor.Exit(Lock);
        }
    }
}

public class Caller
{
    public void Use(Something thing)
    {
        using (var modifier = thing.StartModifying())
        {
            modifier.OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations("A");
            modifier.OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations("B");

            modifier.OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations("A");
            modifier.OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations("A");
            modifier.OneOfLotsOfDifferentOperations("A");
        }
    }
}

One of the nice things about this is you'll get the lock for the duration of the series of operations (rather than locking in each operation). Which means that the output should come out in the right chunks (my usage of this was getting some output onto screen from an external process)

I do really like the simplicity + transparency of the ThreadSafeList + that does the important bit in stopping crashes

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Use the lock statement to do this. (Read here for more information.)

private List<T> _list;

private List<T> MyT
{
    get { return _list; }
    set
    {
        //Lock so only one thread can change the value at any given time.
        lock (_list)
        {
            _list = value;
        }
    }
}

FYI this probably isn't exactly what your asking - you likely want to lock farther out in your code but I can't assume that. Have a look at the lock keyword and tailor its use to your specific situation.

If you need to, you could lock in both the get and set block using the _list variable which would make it so a read/write can not occur at the same time.

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That's not going to solve his problem; it only stops threads from setting the reference, not adding to the list. –  Tejs May 3 '11 at 19:07
    
And what if one thread is setting the value while another is iterating the collection (it's possible with your code). –  Xaqron May 3 '11 at 19:07
    
Like I said, the lock will probably have to be moved out further in the code. This is just an example of how to use the lock statement. –  Josh M. May 3 '11 at 21:02
    
Yeah, except it's an example of how not to use the lock statement. I can create a complete deadlock and freeze the program with hardly any effort (or by accident) with that example: var myRef = foo.MyT; lock(myRef) { foo.MyT = myRef; } –  Joel Mueller May 3 '11 at 23:22
1  
@Joel Mueller: Sure, if you manufacturer some silly example like that. I'm just trying to illustrate that the asker should look into the lock statement. Using a similar example I could argue that we shouldn't use for loops since you could deadlock the application with hardly any effort: for (int x = 0; x >=0; x += 0) { /* Infinite loop, oops! */ } –  Josh M. May 4 '11 at 11:39
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