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My software developed under Delphi 7.0 has been upgraded and developed under Delphi 2010 RAD Studio XE. It also saves or writes user's settings into binary files. The problem I am running into is that my Delphi 2010 application or software is expected to read binary files created by Delphi 7.0 application, but Delphi 2010 application has problem reading the binary file. Both of these software are copy of each other.

I did set the Record Field Alignment option for the project at 1 on Delphi 7.0 and byte on Delphi 2010.

I am always running into exception "read beyond end of line," when the software reads the binary file.

I read and write a binary file by doing the following.

Writing into a binary file:

procedure WriteUnitFile;
var
  unitFile: File;
  x:integer;
  FileHeader:TFileHeader;
begin
  if not DemoMode then
  begin
    FileHeader.id := 'UnitFile';
    FileHeader.version := 7;

    if fileexists(basedir+unitfilename) then
      BackupFile(basedir+unitfilename);

    AssignFile(unitFile,baseDir+unitfilename);

    if UnitList.Count > 0 then
    begin
      Rewrite(unitFile,1);
      BlockWrite(unitFile, FileHeader, SizeOf(FileHeader));
      for x := 0 to UnitList.Count - 1 do
      begin
        TUnit(UnitList[x]).Write(unitFile);
      end;
    end
    else
      DeleteFile(baseDir+unitfilename);

    CloseFile(unitFile);
  end;
end;

Reading from a binary file:

procedure ReadUnitFile;
var
  unitFile:File;
  newUnit,simUnit:TUnit;
  ut,TypeCard:TUnitType;
  New_Ver_File:TFileHeader;
  Address:SmallInt;
  State:TUnitState;
  SubAddress:SmallInt;
  MyfDefs:array[1..20] of SmallInt;
  fDefs:array[1..16] of SmallInt;
begin

  if FileExists(baseDir + unitfilename) then
  begin
    oneUnit := false;
    AssignFile(unitFile,baseDir+unitfilename);
    AssignFile(newUnitFile,baseDir+Dummyfilename);
    Reset(unitFile,1);

    BlockRead(unitFile,New_Ver_File,SizeOf(New_Ver_File));

    Reset(UnitFile,1);
    BlockRead(UnitFile,New_Ver_File,SizeOf(New_Ver_File));

    while not Eof(UnitFile) do
    begin
      BlockRead(UnitFile,ut,SizeOf(ut));
      case ut of
        tutSimulator:newUnit := TSimulator.Create;
        tutDX2202:newUnit := TDX2202.Create;
        tutDX8884CS:newUnit:=TDX8884CS.Create;
        tutDX8F44F: newUnit := TDX8F44F.Create;
        tutDX0008:newUnit := TDX0008.Create;
        tutDX0800:newUnit := TDX0800.Create;
        tutDX8000:newUnit := TDX8000.Create;
        tutDX1000:newUnit := TDX1000.Create;
        tutDX0100:newUnit := TDX0100.Create;
        tutDX4404:newUnit := TDX4404.Create;
        tutDX0020:newUnit := TDX0020.Create;
        tutDX0080:newUnit := TDX0080.Create;        
        tutDX8814:newUnit := TDX8814.Create;
        tutDX8814CS:newUnit := TDX8814CS.Create;
        tutDX8884:newUnit := TDX8884.Create;
        else
                newUnit := TUnit.Create;
      end;
      newUnit.Read(unitFile);
      if DemoMode then
      begin
        if oneUnit = true then
        begin
          simUnit := TSimulator.Create;
          simUnit.Assign(newUnit);
          newUnit.Free;
          newUnit := simUnit;
        end
        else
        begin
          oneUnit := true;
        end;
      end;
      unitList.Add(newUnit);
    end;
    CloseFile(unitfile);
    UnitsDlg.UnitGrid.RowCount := unitList.Count+1;
    if UnitsDlg.UnitGrid.RowCount > 1 then
      UnitsDlg.UnitGrid.FixedRows := 1;
    UnitsDlg.FillIn;
  end
  else
  begin
       UnitsDlg.UnitGrid.RowCount := 1;
  end;
end;

UPDATE: Here is the user-defined datatypes:

  TFileHeader = record
    id:string[32];
    version:SmallInt;
  end;

TUnitType = (tutUnused,tutSimulator,tutDX2202,tutDX0008,tutDX0800,tutDX8000,
                 tutDX1000,tutDX4404,tutDX0020,tutDX8814,tutDX8814CS,
                 tutDX8884,tutDX8884CS,tutDX8f44f,tutDX0080,tutDX0100,tutLast);

TUnitState = (tusDisabled,tusEnabled);

TUnit = class(TObject)
  changeLink:TUnit;
  Address: SmallInt;
  SubAddress:SmallInt;
  State:TUnitState;
  uType:TUnitType;
  RegCnt:integer;
  fRegs:array[1..20] of SmallInt;
  fDefs:array[1..20] of SmallInt;
  MsgCnt:LongWord;
  RxCnt:LongWord;
  BreakCnt: LongWord;
  LineErrCnt: LongWord;
  OtherErrCnt:LongWord;
  TimeoutCnt: LongWord;
  BadMsgErrCnt:LongWord;
  XSumErrCnt:LongWord;
  OutsFlag:Boolean;
  CommBits:LongWord;
  OfflineCnt:integer;
  Online:Boolean;
  CurReg:integer;
  selectedonce,usedIP:Boolean;
  LastDigitalOut,LastDigitalIn,
  CurRegOut,umsglen,urmsglen,
  dummycount,Unitlocation,
  CommLocation:integer;
private

public
   followed by list of procedures and functions...
end;

Is there something I am missing or not understanding very well?

One thing I did forget to mention is that Delphi 2010 application reads and writes into binary files just fine without making any changes to the code, but it has problem only when reading files created by Delphi 7.0. application.

Obviously, this question is related to Record Field Alignment. So, what should I set it on my Delphi 2010 (Byte, Word, Double Word, Quad Word), if Delphi 7.0 is set at 1.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
4  
This isn't your actual code. Reading and writing a simple integer type works fine between D7 and D2010. Post your real datatypes and code if you want help. I'm suspecting you're trying to read records. Right? –  Ken White May 3 '11 at 19:45
3  
Ken's right, Integer is unchanged from D7 to D2010. More likely is that there are characters involved. Char is two bytes wide in D2009+, but only 1 byte wide prior to that. –  David Heffernan May 3 '11 at 19:53
    
I was just showing a sample of how I read and write into a binary file. I just updated my posting with a real code. Thanks –  Thayananthan Narayanan May 3 '11 at 20:24
    
Please show us the definition of the user-defined types in your example. We can't help you until you do so. –  David Heffernan May 3 '11 at 21:16
2  
I'll repeat: Please post your real datatypes and code. You've done part of that (the code), but posted none of the datatypes. Without full information, no one here can possibly do any more than guess. –  Ken White May 3 '11 at 22:03
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The key is in the TFileHeader declaration (and maybe the TUnit and TUnitType declaration). You should add these definitions to your question.

If you define a pure string in either of these records, you need to use ShortString instead of String in Delphi 2010 to make it work.

String in Delphi 7 = 1 byte per char.
String in Delphi 2010 = 2 bytes per char.

Update:

Your last update doesn't really reveal any new information, but the fDefs variable in the ReadUnitFile procedure is defined as an array[1..16] of SmallInt;, but in your TUnit class, fDefs is an array[1..20] of SmallInt;?

The fDefs variable doesn't seem to be used, but this might be the difference that causes the EOL error?

You should define arrays like this as a common Type, anyway, to ensure that they can be passed around and assigned to each other as compatible types (eg. as parameters in methods).

Yet an update:

The error is not in the strings, but in the Size of TObject.

In Delphi 2009, TObject increased the size from 4 bytes to 8 bytes.
The first 4 bytes is a pointer to the objects VMT (as it has been for a long time), and in the last 4 bytes (IIRC), it is possible to contain a reference to a synchronization monitor.

Have a look at this nice article: http://blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz/2009/03/25/38138/

share|improve this answer
    
ShortString can be used if and only if strings are shorter than 255 characters. –  user160694 May 3 '11 at 21:42
    
Saying "you should post more information" and the rest of what you've said isn't an answer; it's at best a comment to the original post. I'd delete this before you start collecting downvotes, if I were you. –  Ken White May 3 '11 at 22:09
    
@Ken, I consider this to be an answer, not a comment. First paragraph points out where the problem lies and that more information on the declarations will provide more accurate answers. IMHO, this is not necessary yet, because its obvious that these types contains strings (FileHeader.id := 'UnitFile';). The second paragraph suggest a solution based on the available information: The Delphi 2010 version of the program must read the strings in the same manner that Delphi 7 wrote the strings. Last paragraph briefly explains the differences between Delphi 7 strings and Delphi 2010 strings. –  Jørn E. Angeltveit May 4 '11 at 8:33
    
I believe Jorn is right that I did notice string for short string. Still, keep the conversation going. There maybe more... –  Thayananthan Narayanan May 4 '11 at 13:26
1  
Of all the answers Jorn E. came close. It is definitely do with reading and writing records. As a test, I changed the project setting for Record Field Alignment from one to another. My software failed miserably except for "Byte" option. Just on the side note, part of my program does use TStream to read and write into a binary file which doesn't seem to have any problem at all under all condition. –  Thayananthan Narayanan May 5 '11 at 20:46
show 2 more comments

Mark all your records you write to file in blocks with packed keyword both in Delphi 7 and 2010.

share|improve this answer
    
The records written by Delphi 7 already exist. They'd all have to be read and rewritten. –  Ken White May 3 '11 at 22:46
    
@Ken, you can work around that. Declare the record as packed so Delphi doesn't add any extra "padding" and then add manual padding so all fields are properly aligned. Once this is done both D7 and D2010 applications would be able to properly read existing records. That is, if the problem really is related to record miss-alignment. –  Cosmin Prund May 4 '11 at 6:51
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I don't know the answer, but I can give you some directions on how to properly identify the problem yourself. Once the problem is identified, the solution would usually immediately follow.

How to debug the issue

Since you're getting "read beyond end of line file" errors, you're obviously dealing with changing record size. A number of things can cause that:

  • Alignment changes. Unless the record is defined as packed record the compiler assumes it's only used internally so it's free to change it's alignment. Since CPU's (and OS'es) changed allot in the D7 - D2010 time frame, is reasonable to expect changes in alignment between the two compilers.
  • Underlying data type size changes. Delphi 2009 made the change to Unicode, so D2009+ (including D2010) has two-bytes Chars. If your record contains Char data, that can cause the change in record size.

Back to debugging. You can write a bit of trivial code that displays the size of the record itself, the size of each of it's fields and the offset for each of the fields. Run this code from both D7 and D2010, make a note of all the numbers and address the possible differences:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

type

  TTestRecord = record
    IntField: Integer;
    ShortStrField1: string[6];
    ShortStrField2: string[5];
    D: Double;
  end;

var R: TTestRecord;

begin
  WriteLn('TTestRecord size: ', SizeOf(R));
  WriteLn('IntField size: ', SizeOf(R.IntField), ', offset: ', Integer(@R.IntField) - Integer(@R));
  WriteLn('ShortStrField1 size: ', SizeOf(R.ShortStrField1), ', offset: ', Integer(@R.ShortStrField1) - Integer(@R));
  WriteLn('ShortStrField2 size: ', SizeOf(R.ShortStrField2), ', offset: ', Integer(@R.ShortStrField2) - Integer(@R));
  WriteLn('D size: ', SizeOf(R.D), ', offset: ', Integer(@R.D) - Integer(@R));
  ReadLn;
end.

Once you get this information you can change the record so it looks the same on both Delphi 7 and Delphi 2010. I'd start on the Delphi 7 platform; I'd first change the definition to packed record and then add extra padding bytes to the record to maintain field offsets. The new type definition would look like this:

TTestRecord = packed record
  IntField: Integer;
  ShortStrField1: string[6];
  ShortStrField2: string[5];
  _DummyPadding: array[0..6] of Byte; // Added to fix D's alignment after adding "packed"
  D: Double;
end;

Once this is done move to Delphi 2010, keeping the packed modifier and all the manually added padding. Run the code that displays field size and alignment, pay special attention to the size of the individual fields: if you've got any Char fields in your record, you'll need to change them to AnsiChar. Fortunately both Delphi 7 and Delphi 2010 know about AnsiChar and consider it to be 1 byte long.

share|improve this answer
    
Packing has an adverse effect on performance. If the data are written rarely, but used often once loaded, it is better to avoid packing and store them avoiding to simply dump to disk their memory image. –  user160694 May 4 '11 at 13:44
    
@ldsandon: agreed, so you must unpack it on memory. But always use it packed when write on disk. If the OP packed the record on all apps beforehand, this question would never happened. –  Fabricio Araujo May 4 '11 at 18:41
    
IMHO "dumping memory to disk" is a technique that could be useful as a quick&dirt solution (i.e. temporary files, or the like), but should not be used for any need of persistent storage. –  user160694 May 4 '11 at 20:43
    
@ldsandon, packed records are exactly what you'd use when you define a binary file format: they allow you to express things like "the file header starts with a 8 byte signature, followed by a 4 byte checksum, followed by a 2 byte counter and a 4 byte offset". You put all that in a packed record and can read the whole header at once. It's not quick&dirty if the record was defined as way to transfer data from RAM to disc. Do a grep on your Delphi's source file looking for packed record, you'll see it used countless times for all sorts of headers. –  Cosmin Prund May 5 '11 at 6:29
    
sure, if you design a file structure you would use packed records to use a standard format and avoid alignment issue when using different tools to read/write data. But when you design a memory structure you should be careful to use packed, because of the performance penalty. Nowhere is written that there should be a 1:1 mapping between disk data layout, network data layout and memory data layout. Only lazy programmers IMHO work that way, and bad code soon or later fires back. –  user160694 May 5 '11 at 7:18
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