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I am familiar with Linux, less with IIS. I have been using Linux/Apache to share user directories for a while set up like this:

/home/user1/public_html
/home/user2/public_html etc.

...and users can type in a URL to view their public files at:

http://www.mycompany.com/~user1/
http://www.mycompany.com/~user2/ etc.

Combined with SMB sharing and drive mapping on client windows boxes makes it very convenient for corporate users to drop files into a publicly available folder temporarily for someone else to download. They just email the other person the URL.

Searching the internet for "IIS public folders" and variants, yields OWA and Exchange results which I don't want. What is the proper terminology for this setup in Windows/IIS? How do you do it in Windows for all domain users?

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In IIS you have to create a virtual directory for each user. IIS does not have an equivalent of the Apache UserDir directive. That's because IIS does not have a concept of users (in the sense of a subscriber to a webserver host).

Of course you could roll your own definition of who users are in IIS. In IIS 7, things like virtual directories are stored in an XML file ApplicationHost.config. You can either create the virtual directories manually via the ISS console, or programmatically via the ApplicationHost.config file.

Reference: (1) http://www.advancedinstaller.com/user-guide/tutorial-iis.html#virtual-directory (2) http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/mod/mod_userdir.html#userdir (3) http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/124/introduction-to-applicationhostconfig/

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