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This is a followup to an earlier question. I got some good suggestions for that, so I thought I would try my luck again.

from itertools import takewhile

if K is None:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]'
else:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]' and i < K

af=open('a')
bf=open('b', 'w')
cf=open('c', 'w')

i = 0
if K is None:
    for line in takewhile(illuminacond, af):
        line_split=line.split(',')
        pid=line_split[1][0:3]
        out = line_split[1] + ',' + line_split[2] + ',' + line_split[3][1] + line_split[3][3] + ',' \
                                  + line_split[15] + ',' + line_split[9] + ',' + line_split[10]
        if pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv':
            i = i+1
            bf.write(out.strip('"')+'\n')
            cf.write(line)
else:
    for line in takewhile(illuminacond, af):
        line_split=line.split(',')
        pid=line_split[1][0:3]
        out = line_split[1] + ',' + line_split[2] + ',' + line_split[3][1] + line_split[3][3] + ',' \
                            + line_split[15] + ',' + line_split[9] + ',' + line_split[10]
        if pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv':
            i = i+1
            bf.write(out.strip('"')+'\n')

Is it possible to compactify this code? If I have some stuff in common in two loops like this, one obvious possibility is to just factor out the common code, but here, eww. The annoying thing is that the only difference here is the writing to c.

Brief summary of code: If K is not None, then loop over K lines of a and write to both b and c. Otherwise, loop over all of a and just write to b.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One check, one loop, no classes, psyco-optimizable.

from itertools import takewhile

if K is None:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]'
    def action(cf, line): cf.write(line)
else:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]' and i < K
    def action(cf, line): pass

af=open('a')
bf=open('b', 'w')
cf=open('c', 'w')

i = 0
for line in takewhile(illuminacond, af):
    line_split=line.split(',')
    pid=line_split[1][0:3]
    out = line_split[1] + ',' + line_split[2] + ',' + line_split[3][1] + line_split[3][3] + ',' \
                              + line_split[15] + ',' + line_split[9] + ',' + line_split[10]
    if pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv':
        i = i+1
        bf.write(out.strip('"')+'\n')
        action(cf, line)
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, not bad! What is the function calling cost here? –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 20:33
    
Also, intrigued by the psyco reference. Know almost nothing about psyco though. What does it mean for Python code to be psyco-optimizable? –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 20:41
    
Function calling cost strongly depends on python version/arch. Psyco is a python optimizer (unfortunately not supported with python > 2.6 for now). I've done some measurements using this script, pure CPython function calls are ~170-190ns/call on my system, CPython+Psyco gives ~9-35ns/call. –  abbot May 4 '11 at 5:51
    
Thanks, that's very interesting and useful information. I'm running Python 2.6 on Debian, so I could see how much of a difference using Psyco makes. –  Faheem Mitha May 4 '11 at 7:46

Why not use only one loop, but including the condition inside that loop? Also, you can get rid of the redundancy in that lambda, I think.

from itertools import takewhile

k_is_none = K is None

def illuminacond(x):
    global i
    global K
    result = x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]'
    if not k_is_none:
        result = result and i < K
    return result

af=open('a')
bf=open('b', 'w')
cf=open('c', 'w')

i = 0
for line in takewhile(illuminacond, af):
    line_split=line.split(',')
    pid=line_split[1][0:3]
    out = line_split[1] + ',' + line_split[2] + ',' + line_split[3][1] + line_split[3][3] + ',' \
                              + line_split[15] + ',' + line_split[9] + ',' + line_split[10]
    if pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv':
        i = i+1
        bf.write(out.strip('"')+'\n')
        if k_is_none:
            cf.write(line)
share|improve this answer
    
The condition K is None will need to be checked at least K times. Otherwise, no, nothing wrong. Granted, in this case, the check is not very timeconsuming, but suppose it was? –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 19:51
1  
Just cache it like this: my_cond = K is None –  Brian O'Dell May 3 '11 at 19:56
    
Now you are doing not one, but two runtime checks for K. :-) –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 19:57
    
@Brian: Sorry, don't follow. –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 19:58
    
@faheem-mitha As @brian-odell was typing his response, I was editing my suggested code. If you're worried about that comparison, do it once and store the result. k_is_none = K is None –  arussell84 May 3 '11 at 19:59

Why not just:

from itertools import takewhile

illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]' and (K is None or i<K) #i'm not so sure about this part, confused me a little :).

af=open('a')
bf=open('b', 'w')
cf=open('c', 'w')

for line in takewhile(illuminacond, af):
    line_split=line.split(',')
    pid=line_split[1][0:3]
    out = line_split[1] + ',' + line_split[2] + ',' + line_split[3][1] + line_split[3][3] + ',' \
                              + line_split[15] + ',' + line_split[9] + ',' + line_split[10]
    if pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv':
        i = i+1
        bf.write(out.strip('"')+'\n')
        if K is None:
            cf.write(line)
share|improve this answer

How about this (second class based version)?

from itertools import takewhile

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, K = None):
        self.bf=open('b', 'w')
        self.cf=open('c', 'w')
        self.count = 0
        self.K = K

    def Go(self):
        for self.line in takewhile(self.Lamda(), open('a')):
            self.SplitLine()
            if self.IsValidPid():
                self.WriteLineToFiles()

    def SplitLine(self):
        self.lineSplit=self.line.split(',')

    def Lamda(self):
        if self.K is None:
            return lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]'
        else:
            return lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]' and self.count < self.K

    def IsValidPid(self):
        pid=self.lineSplit[1][0:3]
        return pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv'

    def WriteLineToFiles(self):
        self.count += 1
        self.bf.write(self.ParseLine())
        if self.K is None:
            self.cf.write(self.line)

    def ParseLine(self):
        return (self.lineSplit[1] + ',' + self.lineSplit[2] + ',' + 
                self.lineSplit[3][1] + self.lineSplit[3][3] + ',' +
                self.lineSplit[15] + ',' + self.lineSplit[9] + ',' + 
                self.lineSplit[10]).strip('"')+'\n'

Foo().Go()

Original version:

from itertools import takewhile

if K is None:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]'
else:
    illuminacond = lambda x: x.split(',')[0] != '[Controls]' and i < K

def Parse(line):
    return (line[1] + ',' + line[2] + ',' + line[3][1] + line[3][3] + ',' +
            line[15] + ',' + line[9] + ',' + line[10]).strip('"')+'\n'

def IsValidPid(line_split):
    pid=line_split[1][0:3]
    return pid!='cnv' and pid!='hCV' and pid!='cnv'

bf=open('b', 'w')
cf=open('c', 'w')

def WriteLineToFiles(line, line_split):
    bf.write(Parse(line_split))
    if K is None:
        cf.write(line)

i = 0

for line in takewhile(illuminacond, open('a')):
    line_split=line.split(',')
    if IsValidPid(line_split):
        WriteLineToFiles(line, line_split)
        i += 1
share|improve this answer
    
Right, that's what I meant by "factor out the common code" in my question above. That's certainly one way to go. –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 20:04
    
I usually start with one abstraction layer, group together pieces of code that have a common interest, factor out into methods and give them good names. No comments are needed and the code is de facto self documented. It's very iterative and incremental in its nature, the way it should be :) –  ralphtheninja May 3 '11 at 20:06
    
Added a second class based version which encapsulates things a bit more and makes for better abstraction. You understand right away what the code does by checking out Go(). –  ralphtheninja May 3 '11 at 20:27
    
+1 for effort, but I'm not a big fan of a class methods approach to things unless absolutely necessary. –  Faheem Mitha May 3 '11 at 20:38
    
@Faheem: Well you can pick anyone of them, I don't care :D Necessity can be discussed on many levels. Personally I believe that the cleaner the code is, the less you need to maintain and debug it. You benefit in the long run. Would be sweet if someone could continue refactoring it :) –  ralphtheninja May 3 '11 at 20:41

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