Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
    private List<T> _T;
    private readonly object _syncLock = new object();

    private List<T> MyT
    {
        get
        {
            lock (_syncLock)
                return _T.ToList<T>();
        }
        set
        {
            lock (_syncLock)
                _T = value;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
    
Under the assumption that you won't be updating the current value based on the current value... then yes, it's somewhat thread safe. However, if you have any code that looks like "myTSObj.MyT = myTSObj.MyT + 1", then no... it's really not. You've opened yourself up to race conditions in this case. –  Christopher Harris May 3 '11 at 19:52
    
I think it's safe, modifying the original list would modify the copy that ToList() makes, not the original. That would then be assigned as the new member. –  James Michael Hare May 3 '11 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Nope, it's not thread-safe. Look at the following code:

static MyClass<int> sharedInstance = ...;

// Create a list
var list = new List<int>();

// Share the list
sharedInstance.MyT = list;

// list is now shared, this call is not thread-safe.
list.Add(5);

The problem is that you allow consumers to have a reference to an internal data structure. You can solve this problem as follows:

private List<T> MyT
{
    get
    {
        lock (_syncLock)
            return _T.ToList<T>();
    }
    set
    {
        var copy = value.ToList();

        lock (_syncLock)
            _T = copy;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you need to lock the set? As it's just a reference assignment –  Ryan Lee Jan 12 at 5:18
    
@EpiX: Strictly spoken not. Advantage of having a lock is that it adds a memory barrier. This clears the cache and prevents other threads from getting an old (already cached) reference. So it prevents other threads from getting the old value even after set is called. But since lock is already used in the get, the lock in set is redundant. However, I do like to use lock in both set and get, because this is in most cases required and makes the code less confusing this that case. If we would remove the lock from set, we will have to comment explicitly why that lock is not required –  Steven Jan 12 at 13:39

Yes. You have used a member variable as the lock and made sure it can't be changed. That will work fine.

share|improve this answer
1  
And yet, you can still have race conditions. –  Christopher Harris May 3 '11 at 19:54
    
How exactly? It's a list, not an int like in your other comment. –  Nik May 3 '11 at 19:55
    
true, but the idea is still the same. Assume your logic adds an item to the list if the item does not already exist in the list. However, another thread running the same logic does the same thing. It's possible to end up with the same value multiple times. To avoid this, your logic should be locking down the object cannot possible avoid all situations like this. –  Christopher Harris May 3 '11 at 19:57
    
That is certainly true; however, I believe that is not a race condition specific to this logic. It is instead specific to the using class. This logic makes the list property thread safe. Race conditions are a problem for the using code. –  Nik May 3 '11 at 19:59
    
True. I agree with that, but the question was "Is this thread safe", and the answer is no. it cannot possibly be thread safe, as he hasn't defined the use case for which it needs to be thread safe. If the use case is "I want to be able to read the whole list, and assign the value to a reference of a new list without confusing other classes", then yes. It's thread safe. Otherwise, it's really not. –  Christopher Harris May 3 '11 at 20:02

Yes, you seem to be safe. If you look at ToList()'s definition, it's:

public static List<TSource> ToList<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    return new List<TSource>(source);
}

So essentially you are creating a new list which contains the elements of the old list, all under the lock you provide which gives it thread safety.

Now, the CONTENTS of the list will be the same references in both lists, so it doesn't protect you from altering the original objects STORED in the list, it only protects the list itself.

share|improve this answer
    
That's ok. I use it with value types. –  Xaqron May 3 '11 at 20:08
    
You can't conclude the solution to be thread-safe, by just looking at the ToList<TSource>() method. In fact, when supplying an instance to this method, while changing it underneath will break it (look in the List<T>.ctor). See my answer. Here I give an example how to introduce a race condition. –  Steven May 3 '11 at 21:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.