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Compiling with gcc 4.4.3 on Ubuntu 10.04.2 x86_64 I get the following warning:

warning: comparison between pointer and integer

for this line:

if (strptime(date_time, "%d-%b-%y %T", &tm) == NULL) {

If I change NULL to 0 the warning goes away. But the man page for strptime states that it returns NULL on error. I am including <time.h> with #define __USE_XOPEN 1 on the previous line. I have also tried #define _XOPEN_SOURCE.

Thank you for your time.

EDIT

The full includes:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define __USE_XOPEN 1 /* needed for strptime */
#include <time.h>

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <errno.h>

#include "recv.h"
#include "tcp.h"
#include "types.h"

EDIT

The following code gives the same warning:

#define __USE_XOPEN 1 /* needed for strptime */
#include <time.h>

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    struct tm tm;
    char date_time[] = "3-May-11 12:49:00";

    if (strptime(date_time, "%d-%b-%y %T", &tm) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: strptime failed matching input\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

EDIT EDIT

But changing it to _XOPEN_SOURCE worked! And moving the define to the top of the program fixed the original.

share|improve this question
    
what is stored in date_time? –  Jordan May 3 '11 at 20:29
1  
Hello, Patrick. Welcome to Stack Overflow. Could you please edit your question by adding (to the bottom) a Short, Self-contained, Compilable Exampe? If you were to post a 10-line program that invokes this warning, we would be able to tell you instantly what the problem is. Without such a program, we are mostly just guessing. –  Robᵩ May 3 '11 at 20:40
1  
Your #define __USE_XOPEN (which you shouldn't use) is not before any header as it should. It must appear before #include <stdio.h> –  pmg May 3 '11 at 20:48
    
@Rob: Sure, I'll try to put one together. –  Patrick May 3 '11 at 20:49
    
Do not #define __USE_XOPEN! –  pmg May 3 '11 at 21:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

[edited after posting of complete includes-block]

You're using the wrong feature-selection macro and you're doing it in the wrong place.
#define __USE_XOPEN 1 only works when glibc does it internally, not when you do it.
#define _XOPEN_SOURCE is what you're supposed to use, but it only works if you put it before all #includes of system headers.

Also, your code shows poor style: explicit comparison to NULL (or 0) inside an if is a bad code smell. You should write it like this:

if (!strptime(...))

Also also, reasonable people can disagree with this, but I don't believe in using NULL at all. In C, 0 is a perfectly good null pointer constant except under very unusual conditions -- and under those conditions NULL doesn't work either. (Things are different in C++.)

share|improve this answer
    
However the warning he's getting is an indication that strptime() isn't being prototyped - I think he wants get to the root cause of the warning instead of avoiding NULL here. –  Michael Burr May 3 '11 at 20:36
    
strptime isn't one of the functions that causes actual problems if you use it like this without a prototype. –  zwol May 3 '11 at 20:38
    
Actually it does. Any use of a function with the wrong declaration results in undefined behavior, and missing declarations are not even valid compilable C with C99. –  R.. May 3 '11 at 20:43
1  
@Zack - without a protoype, you risk calling with incorrect parameters. Even if you call with correct parameters, you can't reliably use the return value on some platforms (such as the x86_64 platform discussed in the question) because half of the pointer being returned is lost when converted to int. Granted, if you're just using it as an operand to ! you'd be very unlucky if it returned a non-NULL pointer that had a lower half that happened to be 0, but stranger bugs have occurred in the real world. And with a prototype, the possibility of that particular problem goes away. –  Michael Burr May 3 '11 at 20:45
    
@R That level of pedantry is quite inappropriate for a basic question like this one. @Michael Good point about the pointer getting truncated to int, I hadn't thought of that. Too much time spent with ILP32 systems. –  zwol May 3 '11 at 20:52

According to POSIX documentation, strptime is declared in <time.h>.

You need

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE
/* other headers, if needed, after the #define
#include <assert.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdio.h>
*/
#include <time.h>

to have a correct prototype in scope.

Without a prototype, the compiler assumes functions return a int.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I'm not sure I understand the question. I have #include <time.h> –  Patrick May 3 '11 at 20:31
    
Oh @Patrick ... you've added the comment while I edited. The #defines need to come before any #include; not just before the function usage. –  pmg May 3 '11 at 20:34
    
Thank you, but that is how I have it in my code. –  Patrick May 3 '11 at 20:39
    
Never define __USE_XOPEN. It's an implementation-internal macro used in glibc features.h to implement _XOPEN_SOURCE and other feature test macros' behavior. Defining it yourself is not only nonportable, but could break things. –  R.. May 3 '11 at 20:41
    
Thanks @R.., option removed for the comment in my post –  pmg May 3 '11 at 20:49

I suppose you are getting that warning because strptime isn't declared. (Without a declaration, strptime defaults to returning an int.) As you have already guessed, this is probably due to a missing #define _XOPEN_SOURCE.

The following program produces no warnings, using "gcc" on Ubuntu 10.04.2 LTS. Is this what your program looks like?

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE
#include <time.h>

int main() {
  struct tm tm;
  char date_time[] = "Monday morning";
  if (strptime(date_time, "%d-%b-%y %T", &tm) == NULL) {
  }
  return 0;
}

EDIT You must not define __USE_XOPEN. You must define _XOPEN_SOURCE. From the linux man page, the correct usage is :

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE
#include <time.h>
share|improve this answer

Simple. compare it with 0. if strptime(date_time, "%d-%b-%y %T", &tm) == 0

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