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I was going through SCJP 6 book by Kathe sierra and came across this explanations of throwing exceptions in overridden method. I quite didn't get it. Can any one explain it to me ?

The overriding method must NOT throw checked exceptions that are new or broader than those declared by the overridden method. For example, a method that declares a FileNotFoundException cannot be overridden by a method that declares a SQLException, Exception, or any other non-runtime exception unless it's a subclass of FileNotFoundException.

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here's a site that you might find helpful: javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=129 –  Tim Bish May 3 '11 at 20:43

9 Answers 9

up vote 49 down vote accepted

It means that if a method declares to throw a given exception, the overriding method in a subclass can only declare to throw that exception or its subclass. For example:

class A {
   public void foo() throws IOException {..}
}

class B extends A {
   @Override
   public void foo() throws SocketException {..} // allowed

   @Override
   public void foo() throws SQLException {..} // NOT allowed
}

SocketException extends IOException, but SQLException does not.

This is because of polymorphism:

A a = new B();
try {
    a.foo();
} catch (IOException ex) {
    // forced to catch this by the compiler
}

If B had decided to throw SQLException, then the compiler could not force you to catch it, because you are referring to the instance of B by its superclass - A. On the other hand, any subclass of IOException will be handled by clauses (catch or throws) that handle IOException

The rule that you need to be able to refer to objects by their superclass is the Liskov Substitution Principle.

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+1 @Bohzo : for a great SSCCE! –  bojangle May 3 '11 at 23:42
    
This also applies while implementing interfaces ? I'm not sure if implementing an interface is still called "overriding". –  Muhammad Gelbana Nov 21 '13 at 7:51
    
How about @Override public void foo() {..} I know it's allowed but the explanation isn't clear for this case. –  danip Aug 25 '14 at 8:41

The overriding method CAN throw any unchecked (runtime) exception, regardless of whether the overridden method declares the exception

Example:

class Super {
    public void test() {
        System.out.println("Super.test()");
    }
}

class Sub extends Super {
    @Override
    public void test() throws IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        // Method can throw any Unchecked Exception
        System.out.println("Sub.test()");
    }
}

class Sub2 extends Sub {
    @Override
    public void test() throws ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException {
        // Any Unchecked Exception
        System.out.println("Sub2.test()");
    }
}

class Sub3 extends Sub2 {
    @Override
    public void test() {
        // Any Unchecked Exception or no exception
        System.out.println("Sub3.test()");
    }
}

class Sub4 extends Sub2 {
    @Override
    public void test() throws AssertionError {
        // Unchecked Exception IS-A RuntimeException or IS-A Error
        System.out.println("Sub4.test()");
    }
}
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To illustrate this, consider:

public interface FileOperation {
  void perform(File file) throws FileNotFoundException;
}

public class OpenOnly implements FileOperation {
  void perform(File file) throws FileNotFoundException {
    FileReader r = new FileReader(file);
  }
}

Suppose you then write:

public class OpenClose implements FileOperation {
  void perform(File file) throws FileNotFoundException {
    FileReader r = new FileReader(file);
    r.close();
  }
}

This will give you a compilation error, because r.close() throws an IOException, which is broader than FileNotFoundException.

To fix this, if you write:

public class OpenClose implements FileOperation {
  void perform(File file) throws IOException {
    FileReader r = new FileReader(file);
    r.close();
  }
}

You will get a different compilation error, because you are implementing the perform(...) operation, but throwing an exception not included in the interface's definition of the method.

Why is this important? Well a consumer of the interface may have:

FileOperation op = ...;
try {
  op.perform(file);
}
catch (FileNotFoundException x) {
  log(...);
}

If the IOException were allowed to be thrown, the client's code is nolonger correct.

Note that you can avoid this sort of issue if you use unchecked exceptions. (I am not suggesting you do or don't, that is a philosophical issue)

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say you have super class A with method M1 throwin E1 and class B deriving from A with method M2 overriding M1. M2 can not throw anything DIFFERENT or LESS SPECIALIZED than E1.

Because of polymorphism, the client using class A should be able to treat B as if it were A. Inharitance ===> Is-a (B is-a A). What if this code dealing with class A was handling exception E1, as M1 declares it throws this checked exception, but then different type of exception was thrown? If M1 was throwing IOException M2 could well throw FileNotFoundException, as it is-a IOException. Clients of A could handle this without a problem. If the exception thrown was wider, clients of A would not have a chance of knowing about this and therefore would not have a chance to catch it.

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In my opinion, it is a fail in the Java syntax design. Polymorphism shouldn't limit the usage of exception handling. In fact, other computer languages don't do it (C#).

Moreover, a method is overriden in a more specialiced subclass so that it is more complex and, for this reason, more probable to throwing new exceptions.

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Well java.lang.Exception extends java.lang.Throwable. java.io.FileNotFoundException extends java.lang.Exception. So if a method throws java.io.FileNotFoundException then in the override method you cannot throw anything higher up the hierarchy than FileNotFoundException e.g. you can't throw java.lang.Exception. You could throw a subclass of FileNotFoundException though. However you would be forced to handle the FileNotFoundException in the overriden method. Knock up some code and give it a try!

The rules are there so you don't lose the original throws declaration by widening the specificity, as the polymorphism means you can invoke the overriden method on the superclass.

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The overriding method must NOT throw checked exceptions that are new or broader than those declared by the overridden method.

Example:

class Super {
    public void throwCheckedExceptionMethod() throws IOException {
        FileReader r = new FileReader(new File("aFile.txt"));
        r.close();
    }
}

class Sub extends Super {    
    @Override
    public void throwCheckedExceptionMethod() throws FileNotFoundException {
        // FileNotFoundException extends IOException
        FileReader r = new FileReader(new File("afile.txt"));
        try {
            // close() method throws IOException (that is unhandled)
            r.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }
}

class Sub2 extends Sub {
    @Override
    public void throwCheckedExceptionMethod() {
        // Overriding method can throw no exception
    }
}
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The overriding method must NOT throw checked exceptions that are new or broader
than those declared by the overridden method. 

This simply means when you override an existing method the Exception that this overloaded method throws should be either the same Exception which the original method throws or any of it's subclass.

Note that checking whether all cached Exceptions are handles is check at compile time and not at runtime. So at compile time itself java compiler checks the type of exception the overloaded method is throwing. Since which overloaded method will be executed can be decided only at runtime we cannot know what king of Exception we have to catch.


Example

Lets say we have class A and it's subclass B. A has method m1 and class B has overriden this method(lets call it m2 to avoid confusion..). Lets say m1 throw E1 and m2 throws E2 which is superclass of E1.Now we write the following peice of code

A myAObj = new B();
myAObj.m1();

Note that this m1 is nothing but a call to m2(again method signatures are same in overloaded methods so do not get confuse with m1 and m2.. they are just to differentiate in this example... they both have same signature). But at compile time all java compiler does is goes to the reference type(Class A in this case) checks the method if it is present(yes m1 is present) and expects programmer to handle it. So obviously you will throw or catch E1. Now at runtime if the overloaded method throws E2 which is the superclass of E1 then .... well it very wrong[For the same reason we cannot say B myBObj = new A() :) ]. Hence jave does not allow it. Exception thrown by the overloaded method must be same or subclass of Exception thrown by the original method.

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What explanation do we attribute to the below

class BaseClass {

    public  void print() {
        System.out.println("In Parent Class , Print Method");
    }

    public static void display() {
        System.out.println("In Parent Class, Display Method");
    }

}


class DerivedClass extends BaseClass {

    public  void print() throws Exception {
        System.out.println("In Derived Class, Print Method");
    }

    public static void display() {
        System.out.println("In Derived Class, Display Method");
    }
}

Class DerivedClass.java throws a compile time exception when the print method throws a Exception , print () method of baseclass does not throw any exception

I am able to attribute this to the fact that Exception is narrower than RuntimeException , it can be either No Exception (Runtime error ), RuntimeException and their child exceptions

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