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We use code that uses syncronized blocks around segments of code with a lot of wait and notifyAll() calls. We are trying to convert these to use Java 5 Lock.lock() and Lock.unlock() methods. How do I migrate this code to remove all the wait and notifyAll calls. I do not know the equivalent to these using the new Locking features.

Any links with examples would be appreciated.

Thanks in Advance

Eq., the following code needs to be converted to use Lock.lock() and lock.unlock The first part to remove the synchronized block is simple as I just need to call lock() method. The question is what can be done for the notifyAll() and wait methods.

     synchronized( LOCK )
            {
                while( !Thread.interrupted() )
                {
                 try
                    {

                        working = runRules();

                        if( !working )
                            LOCK.notifyAll();

                        LOCK.wait( working ? shortTimeout : longTimeout );
                    }
                    catch( final InterruptedException e )
                    {
                        Package.log.info( "Thread was interrupted.  Exiting.", e );
                        return;
                    }
                }
            }
share|improve this question
    
If you could post a code sample, you'll get better results- there are many concurrency primitives in 1.5. Giving you advice outside of an example would be probably give you the wrong answer. –  Dataknife May 3 '11 at 20:47
    
Thanks for your reply. I have added the code snippet you asked for. –  Nadeem May 3 '11 at 21:26
3  
ReentrantLocks are more error-prone than synchronized blocks - it is easy to miss the finally block. So unless you need some specific feature - lockInterruptibly or tryLock - there is no point in converting the code. If you are determined to migrate the code to newer APIs, you should consider restructuring the code to use higher-level APIs like Semaphores, Latches or Barriers. –  Binil Thomas May 3 '11 at 22:46
    
@Binil - i agree with everything except your reference to Semaphore. i would consider a Semaphore to be the same "level" of API as Lock and wait/notify. –  jtahlborn May 4 '11 at 0:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use the Conditions provided by the java.util.concurrent.locks package:

 final Object monitor = ...

 ...

 synchronized (monitor) {

     while (!condition) monitor.wait();
     ... do something ...
 }

becomes:

 final ReentrantLock lock = ...;
 final Condition cvar = lock.newCondition();

 ...

 lock.lock();

 try {

     while (!condition) cvar.await();
     ... do something ... 

 } finally {

     lock.unlock();
 }

The signalling side is pretty similar:

 synchronized (monitor) {

      ... do something ...
      monitor.notify();
 }

becomes:

 lock.lock();

 try {

     ... do something ...
     cvar.signalAll();

 } finally {

     lock.unlock();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. I'll try this –  Nadeem May 3 '11 at 21:26

Use Condition objects provided by the Lock.newCondition() factory method. The waiting and notification aspects of an Object's monitor were factored out into this interface.

From a migration point of view:

  • wait() -> await()
  • wait(long) -> await(long, TimeUnit.Millis) or awaitNanos(long * 10000000)
  • notify() -> signal()
  • notifyAll() -> signalAll()

However, conditions are more powerful than monitors in several ways. Firstly they are more fine grained, so you can have multiple conditions for different things. If I have a bounded blocking collection for instance, I can have a condition for full and a condition for empty, and await and notify these separately as elements are added or removed.

There are also additional await variants that allow you to await without being interrupted and await until a certain specific date (time).

The javadocs of the Condition class are very good and describe it and its use in great detail.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. –  Nadeem May 5 '11 at 15:26

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