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I'm trying to minimize repeated code for a number of JAX-RS resource handlers, all of which require a few of the same path and query parameters. The basic url template for each resource looks like this:

/{id}/resourceName

and each resource has multiple subresources:

/{id}/resourceName/subresourceName

So, resource/subresource paths (incl. query parameters) might look like

/12345/foo/bar?xyz=0
/12345/foo/baz?xyz=0
/12345/quux/abc?xyz=0
/12345/quux/def?xyz=0

The common parts across resources foo and quux are @PathParam("id") and @QueryParam("xyz"). I could implement the resource classes like this:

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService
{
    @PathParam("id") String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") String xyz;

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
@Path("/{id}/quux")
public class QuxxService
{
    @PathParam("id") String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") String xyz;

    @GET @Path("abc")
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("def")
    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

I've managed to avoid repeating the parameter injection into every single get* method.1 This is a good start, but I'd like to be able to avoid the repetition across resource classes as well. An approach that works with CDI (which I also need) is to use an abstract base class which FooService and QuuxService could extend:

// BaseService.java
public abstract class BaseService
{
    // JAX-RS injected fields
    @PathParam("id") protected String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") protected String xyz;

    // CDI injected fields
    @Inject protected SomeUtility util;
}

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService extends BaseService
{
    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
@Path("/{id}/quux")
public class QuxxService extends BaseService
{   
    @GET @Path("abc")
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("def")
    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

Inside of the get* methods, the CDI injection (miraculously) works correctly: the util field is not null. Unfortunately, the JAX-RS injection does not work; id and xyz are null in the get* methods of FooService and QuuxService.

Is there a fix or workaround for this problem?

Given that the CDI works as I'd like it to, I'm wondering if the failure to inject @PathParams (etc.) into subclasses is a bug or just part of the JAX-RS spec.


Another approach I have already tried is using BaseService as a single point of entry that delegates to FooService and QuuxService as needed. This is basically as described in RESTful Java with JAX-RS using subresource locators.

// BaseService.java
@Path("{id}")
public class BaseService
{
    @PathParam("id") protected String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") protected String xyz;
    @Inject protected SomeUtility util;

    public BaseService () {} // default ctor for JAX-RS

    // ctor for manual "injection"
    public BaseService(String id, String xyz, SomeUtility util)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.xyz = xyz;
        this.util = util;
    }

    @Path("foo")
    public FooService foo()
    {
        return new FooService(id, xyz, util); // manual DI is ugly
    }

    @Path("quux")
    public QuuxService quux()
    {
        return new QuuxService(id, xyz, util); // yep, still ugly
    }
}

// FooService.java
public class FooService extends BaseService
{
    public FooService(String id, String xyz, SomeUtility util)
    {
        super(id, xyz, util); // the manual DI ugliness continues
    }

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
public class QuuzService extends BaseService
{
    public FooService(String id, String xyz, SomeUtility util)
    {
        super(id, xyz, util); // the manual DI ugliness continues
    }

    @GET @Path("abc")
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("def")
    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

The downside to this approach is that neither CDI injection nor JAX-RS injection works in the subresource classes. The reason for this is fairly obvious2, but what that means is that I have to manually re-inject the fields into the subclasses' constructor, which is messy, ugly, and doesn't easily let me customize further injection. Example: say I wanted to @Inject an instance into FooService but not QuuxService. Because I'm explicitly instantiating the subclasses of BaseService, CDI injection won't work, so the ugliness is continued.


tl;dr What's the right way to avoid repeatedly injecting fields across JAX-RS resource handler classes?

And why aren't inherited fields injected by JAX-RS, while CDI has no issues with this?


Edit 1

With a bit of direction from @Tarlog, I think I've found the answer to one of my questions,

Why aren't inherited fields injected by JAX-RS?

In JSR-311 §3.6:

If a subclass or implementation method has any JAX-RS annotations then all of the annotations on the super class or interface method are ignored.

I'm sure that there's a real reason for this decision, but unfortunately that fact is working against me in this particular use case. I'm still interested in any possible workarounds.


1 The caveat with using field-level injection is that I'm now tied to per-request resource class instantiation, but I can live with that.
2 Because I'm the one calling new FooService() rather than the container/the JAX-RS implementation.

share|improve this question
    
Good question. I'm not sure your caveat #1 is necessary though - at least with RESTeasy we have been able to use per-request field-level injection into singletons via RESTeasy's thread-local proxying. Possibly Jersey does the same? –  Matthew Gilliard May 3 '11 at 22:45
    
Either way, #1 really doesn't really matter at this point. –  Matt Ball May 3 '11 at 23:45
1  
that's a serious bounty. too bad I know nothing about the topic :-) –  nielsbot May 12 '11 at 6:52
1  
The "real reason for [the JSR-311 §3.6] decision," seems like a cop out to avoid having to bother define override behaviors: resources definitely ought be able to be constructed by way of Java inheritance patterns. –  rektide Jan 6 '13 at 22:23

6 Answers 6

In RESTEasy one can construct a class, annotate with @*Param as usual, and finish by annotating the class @Form. This @Form class may then be a parameter injection into any other service's method call. http://docs.jboss.org/resteasy/docs/2.3.5.Final/userguide/html/_Form.html

share|improve this answer

Here is a workaround I'm using:

Define a constructor for the BaseService with 'id' and 'xyz' as params:

// BaseService.java
public abstract class BaseService
{
    // JAX-RS injected fields
    protected String id;
    protected String xyz;

    public BaseService (String id, String xyz) {
        this.id = id;
        this.xyz = zyx;
    }
}

Repeat the constructor on all subclasses with the injects:

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService extends BaseService
{
    public FooService (@PathParam("id") String id, @QueryParam("xyz") String xyz) {
        super(id, xyz);
    }

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}
share|improve this answer

You can add a custom provider, particularly via AbstractHttpContextInjectable:

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService
{
    @Context CommonStuff common;

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}


@Provider
public class CommonStuffProvider
    extends AbstractHttpContextInjectable<CommonStuff>
    implements InjectableProvider<Context, Type>
{

    ...

    @Override
    public CommonStuff getValue(HttpContext context)
    {
        CommonStuff c = new CommonStuff();
        c.id = ...initialize from context;
        c.xyz = ...initialize from context;

        return c;
    }
}

Granted, you'll have to extract the path parameters and/or the query parameters the hard way from HttpContext, but you'll do it once in one place.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a Jersey specific implementation, c/d? –  rektide Jan 6 '13 at 22:15

Looking at Jax's JIRA it seems someone asked for annotation inheritance as milestone for JAX-RS.

The feature you're looking for just doesn't exist in JAX-RS yet, however, would this work? It's ugly, but prevents recurrent injection.

public abstract class BaseService
{
    // JAX-RS injected fields
    @PathParam("id") protected String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") protected String xyz;

    // CDI injected fields
    @Inject protected SomeUtility util;

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public abstract Response getBar();

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public abstract Response getBaz();

    @GET @Path("abc")
    public abstract Response getAbc();

    @GET @Path("def")
    public abstract Response getDef();
}

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService extends BaseService
{
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
@Path("/{id}/quux")
public class QuxxService extends BaseService
{   
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

Or in another workaround :

public abstract class BaseService
{
    @PathParam("id") protected String id;
    @QueryParam("xyz") protected String xyz;

    // CDI injected fields
    @Inject protected SomeUtility util;

    @GET @Path("{stg}")
    public abstract Response getStg(@Pathparam("{stg}") String stg);

}

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService extends BaseService
{
    public Response getStg(String stg) {
        if(stg.equals("bar")) {
              return getBar();
        } else {
            return getBaz();
        }
    }
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

But seeing how touchy you are, frankly, I doubt your frustration will go away with this ugly code :)

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think the first suggestion will work because of JSR-311 §3.6 - basically, putting any annotations on a subclass will cause all annotations on the superclass to be ignored. –  Matt Ball May 10 '11 at 12:50
    
This restriction is only for methods and parameters, not classes ? –  Gepsens May 10 '11 at 14:47
    
I don't think so, and my 2nd attempt (in the question) backs that up. Also, direct quote from JSR-311 §3.6: "If a subclass or implementation method has any JAX-RS annotations then all of the annotations on the super class or interface method are ignored." –  Matt Ball May 10 '11 at 14:56
    
Or what if you nest the classes ? If it still works according to the doc's quote, you could try getting the latest version from the repository see if they have started to add inheritance to @Path and @Provided (which unfortunately, I doubt). –  Gepsens May 10 '11 at 15:48
    
There are multiple ways to take that quote, and as I see it, there are two scopes, the methods and the fields+class, your code doesn't work because you have an @Path on the subclasses which cancels the annotations on the fields. But that doesn't mean that having an annotation on a method, actually cancels the annotations on the main class. –  Gepsens May 10 '11 at 15:58

What is the motivation of avoiding parameters injections?
If the motivation is avoiding of repeating hard-coded strings, so you can easily rename them, you can reuse "constants":

// FooService.java
@Path("/" +  FooService.ID +"/foo")
public class FooService
{
    public static final String ID = "id";
    public static final String XYZ= "xyz";
    public static final String BAR= "bar";

    @PathParam(ID) String id;
    @QueryParam(XYZ) String xyz;

    @GET @Path(BAR)
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path(BAR)
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
@Path("/" +  FooService.ID +"/quux")
public class QuxxService
{
    @PathParam(FooService.ID) String id;
    @QueryParam(FooService.XYZ) String xyz;

    @GET @Path("abc")
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("def")
    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

(Sorry for posting the second answer, but it was too long to put it in a comment of the previous answer)

share|improve this answer
    
It's still duplicate code. If the JAX-RS-injected fields could be properly injected when inherited from an abstract base class — this already works with CDI, jut not JAX-RS! — my problems would be solved. Since CDI can do it, I feel like JAX-RS should do it. –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 14:46
    
Yeah, I know what you mean. If I remember correctly, JAX-RS spec doesn't define if PathParam should be injected in a base class or not. So probably you can try different frameworks. I think it will work with Apache Wink, cannot be 100% sure though –  Tarlog May 4 '11 at 14:51
    
I started digging through JSR-311 but I'm completely unfamiliar with the document so it's probably going to take a fair bit of time for me to find anything conclusive in the spec (if it's there at all). –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 14:53
1  
It's in section 3.2 –  Tarlog May 4 '11 at 14:56
1  
Spot on. That section doesn't mention inherited fields at all. But section 3.6 says "If a subclass or implementation method has any JAX-RS annotations then all of the annotations on the super class or interface method are ignored." This is probably the problem with the second approach I tried. –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 15:20

Instead of using @PathParam, @QueryParam or any other param, you can use @Context UriInfo to access any types of parameters. So your code could be:

// FooService.java
@Path("/{id}/foo")
public class FooService
{
    @Context UriInfo uriInfo;

    public static String getIdParameter(UriInfo uriInfo) {
        return uriInfo.getPathParameters().getFirst("id");
    }

    @GET @Path("bar")
    public Response getBar() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("baz")
    public Response getBaz() { /* snip */ }
}

// QuuxService.java
@Path("/{id}/quux")
public class QuxxService
{
    @Context UriInfo uriInfo;

    @GET @Path("abc")
    public Response getAbc() { /* snip */ }

    @GET @Path("def")
    public Response getDef() { /* snip */ }
}

Pay attention that getIdParameter is static, so you can put it in some utility class and reuse accorss multiple classes.
UriInfo is guaranteed to be threadsafe, so you can keep resource class as singleton.

share|improve this answer
    
That's really no better than injecting the parameters individually into each class' fields or each method's parameters, as far as DRY goes. IMO, this approach is actually worse than using field-level injection. It ends up being more repeated code because each method would have to extract the needed information from uriInfo. –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 12:31
    
I can hardly understand how it can be more repeated code (if your case is really multiple classes, with multiple methods receiving the same parameters): for each parameter you have one method, for each class you have one injection of UriInfo. So if you have N classes, M methods and K parameters, you'll have N injections and K static methods. In your case, you'll have NKM injections. –  Tarlog May 4 '11 at 14:34
    
Using UriInfo is certainly fewer injections, but with M methods per class, N classes, and K parameters (the same parameters for every single method, regardless of which class the method is in) that's still NKM parameters that would have to be manually extracted by the programmer (me). –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 14:40
    
Either way, both of those approaches are more code than just copy-and-pasting the field-level injections into each class. Instead of NKM repeated code, that's N*K repeated code, since each method can use the fields rather than having to (explicitly) do any additional work per-method. Do you see what I mean? –  Matt Ball May 4 '11 at 14:41

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