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I started learning vim a couple of days ago and surprisingly it felt quite natural to me, I also want to get back to learning python. I thought, why not combine the two?
So now I'm looking how to set up a proper python development environment, all my searches turned up either guides for other OSes (which I just couldn't "translate" to windows without feeling like I missed something) and some feel like they are made for previous versions of vim (they assume it has no python support at all...)
So how do you set up vim for python development? I see it already has syntax highlighting, how do I set up compiling? how do I set up debugging (if it's even needed, I read somewhere that it's not really that needed in python)? how do I setup error highlighting? or anything else I might need? I saw some guides setting up a "go to source" link, is that needed in the new version?

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You can also extend vim with python. Just telling! –  manojlds May 3 '11 at 21:28
    
just reminding, python is interpreter programming language (but you still have posibility to compile it). you need addons program, but not inside vim. –  Gunslinger_ May 3 '11 at 21:36
    
Well, if you're not totally stuck on Vim, PyScripter is a very nice Windows compatible (and free) Python editor. manojlds' answer looks very interesting though. Python is fun, good decision to pick it back up. :) –  initzero May 3 '11 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Good choice on VIM!

Have a look here though:

http://dancingpenguinsoflight.com/2009/02/python-and-vim-make-your-own-ide/

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Thank you, it is too for unix based systems but it makes a lot les assumptions than others that I've seen and I managed to go along with it. –  Ziv May 4 '11 at 17:00

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