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I can see first-class member variables using self.__dict__, but I'd like also to see a dictionary of properties, as defined with the @property decorator. How can I do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You could add a function to your class that looks something like this:

def properties(self):
    class_items = self.__class__.__dict__.iteritems()
    return dict((k, getattr(self, k)) 
                for k, v in class_items 
                if isinstance(v, property))

This looks for any properties in the class and then creates a dictionary with an entry for each property with the current instance's value.

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lovely! precisely what I was after. thank you –  Kyle Wild May 3 '11 at 22:14
2  
Be aware that this only lists properties declared on the class itself IIRC. Properties of superclasses will not be listed. –  Walter Mundt May 4 '11 at 4:00
1  
You can walk self.__class__.mro() to find parent classes. –  Éric Araujo Oct 27 '12 at 18:20

The properties are part of the class, not the instance. So you need to look at self.__class__.__dict__

So the properties would be

[k for k,v in self.__class__.__dict__.items() if type(v) is property]
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1  
+1 i like the list comprehension on k,v :) –  Kyle Wild May 3 '11 at 22:15

For an object f, this gives the list of members that are properties:

[n for n in dir(f) if isinstance(getattr(f.__class__, n), property)]
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+1 -- but that's just a list of keywords, correct? –  Kyle Wild May 3 '11 at 22:13
    
yes. The other solutions are more complete. –  thouis May 4 '11 at 5:43

dir(obj) gives a list of all attributes of obj, including methods and attributes.

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Right, but I need to know the properties specifically. I considered overwriting the @property decorator to add them to a registry on obj, but I figured Python probably has a fancy __something__ that already does this. –  Kyle Wild May 3 '11 at 21:48

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