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Why is

void foo(T*);

illegal in both C and C++ (because T is undefined), whereas

void foo(struct T*);

is valid, even though it still does not define T? Is there any situation in which it makes a semantic difference to the caller whether T is a struct or some other type (class/enum/typedef/etc.)?

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1  
just out of curiosity, why would you need to take a pointer to an undefined struct? If it's undefined, then why not just take in a void* ? –  John Leehey May 3 '11 at 21:53
    
@John: Because I haven't included the appropriate header file for the definition of T yet, but I still want my code to compile because I don't see why it matters what T is. –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:54
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@John: This is commonplace. Why bring in a [potentially heavy] definition when all you need [at that point in your code] is a declaration? –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '11 at 21:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In C, because pointer to structs (any struct) all have the same width and alignment properties

6.2.5/27 (C99 Standard)

A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type. Similarly, pointers to qualified or unqualified versions of compatible types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements. All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. All pointers to union types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. Pointers to other types need not have the same representation or alignment requirements.


Pointers to anything, on the other hand, may have distinct width and/or alignment properties (void*, function pointers, unsigned char*, ...)

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@pmg: I can't imagine why a pointer to a union might, for example, ever be different from a pointer to a struct, but if it could hypothetically be the case then that makes perfect sense. :-) Thanks! –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 22:04
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This explains why forward declaration works. However, IMO, it does not answer the actual question posed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '11 at 22:11
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@Tomolak: Quite the opposite. This answer is the only one to answer the question. –  Troubadour May 3 '11 at 22:23
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@Tomalak: The thing is, my issue wasn't "Why doesn't my code compile?" but "Why were C/C++ designed this way?". Your answer states the fact that it doesn't compile, and states the reason why, but it doesn't say what the problem would be if the restriction was removed -- this answer, on the other hand, explains the problem: not all pointers might be the same on a given platform, so the compiler simply can't generate valid code. Now I'm just trying to understand whether or not the compiler could pretend it was a void*, but the answer otherwise explains the root cause of the problem. –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 22:49
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@Tomalak: I'm not sure what you're trying to get at, but I personally found this answer more convincing, because it explained the root cause rather than just saying "that's how it is". If someone else finds yours more convincing then great! That's why we can put multiple answers on this site. :] –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 22:53

void foo(struct T*); simultaneously functions as a forward-declaration of struct T within that scope, so it's safe to name a pointer to it.

In void foo(T*) there is no telling what T is supposed to be. If it turns out to be the name of a variable rather than a type, then the line of code is ill-formed. C++ needs more information before it can say that the line of code is valid.

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@Doug: Interesting about the forward-declaration. But why does it make what T is, when all we need to know is that we're taking in a pointer? –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:53
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@Mehrdad: Because if T is not a type (and, remember, "we" don't know what it is) then the line of code is ill-formed. [I have added this to my answer.] –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '11 at 21:54
    
@Tomalak: So it's just there to make the grammar more strict, rather than for any implementation/ambiguity reasons? –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:55
    
@Mehrdad: Essentially. I'd say all three factors you list are inherently entwined. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '11 at 21:56
    
@Mehrdad: chomp said it best in his answer: "If the mere occurrence of a previously unseen symbol semantically implied a forward type declaration, I think we'd be in a lot of trouble." –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '11 at 21:57
struct T

acts as a forward declaration of T. You're promising the compiler you'll define it later. If you actually did something on T or tried to instantiate it, you'd have problems:

  struct T t1; //error, incomplete type
  struct T* t2; // ok
  t2->foo     // error, incomplete type

Just

 T

is an arbitrary identifier. Is it a variable? Is it a function? The language provides no facility to forward declare without adding struct or class in front of the variable.

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Interesting. But why does it make what T is, when all we need to know is that we're taking in a pointer? –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:52

struct T declares T as a struct even when it appears in a larger declaration, i.e. the declaration of foo. The type is incomplete but that doesn't matter when it's used to declarat a pointer function parameter.

Without the struct the compiler doesn't know anything about what T is supposed to be.

If T had previously been declared as a struct then void foo(T*) would be allowed in C++ but not C because the names of structs don't automatically become type names although you can declared a typedef with an identical name in C if you want to.

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1  
Yes, but my question is, why does that matter? i.e. what difference does it make what T is, when all we need to know is that we're taking in a pointer? –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:51
    
@Mehrdad: I'm not sure I understand what you're driving at. Those are the language rules. Any identifier - object, function or type - needs to be declared before it is used and the struct makes the use of T a declaration. –  Charles Bailey May 3 '11 at 21:55
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Because pointer to structs (any struct) all have the same width and alignment properties (6.2.5/27 "All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other."). Pointers to anything, on the other hand, may have distinct width and/or alignment properties (void*, function pointers, unsigned char*, ...) –  pmg May 3 '11 at 21:58
    
@pmg: So a pointer to a struct and a pointer to a union/enum/etc. could have different alignment properties? –  Mehrdad May 3 '11 at 21:59
    
@Mehrdad: yes, if I interpret the Standard correctly. –  pmg May 3 '11 at 22:01

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