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Are timestamp values stored differently in PostgreSQL when the data type is WITH TIME ZONE versus WITHOUT TIME ZONE? Can the differences be illustrated with simple test cases?

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1  
This related answer may be of help. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 6 '12 at 2:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The differences are covered at the PostgreSQL documentation for date/time types. Yes, the storage of TIME or TIMESTAMP differs between one WITH TIME ZONE or WITHOUT TIME ZONE.

The effects of time zones on these data types is covered specifically in the docs. The difference comes down to the fact that, with a time zone as part of the value, the value can be rendered as a local time in the client, whereas without a time zone value the only meaningful rendering of the value is as UTC time.

The behaviour differs depending on at least three factors:

  • timezone setting in the client
  • data type (i.e. WITH TIME ZONE or WITHOUT TIME ZONE) of the value
  • whether the value is specified with a particular time zone

Here are examples covering the combinations of those factors:

foo=> SET TIMEZONE TO 'Japan';
SET
foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00+09
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 06:00:00+09
(1 row)

foo=> SET TIMEZONE TO 'Australia/Melbourne';
SET
foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00+11
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 08:00:00+11
(1 row)
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5  
Correct only if referring to the process of inserting/retrieving values. But readers should understand that both data types, timestamp with time zone and timestamp without time zone, in Postgres do *not actually store time zone information. You can confirm this with a glance at the data type doc page: Both types takes up the same number of octets and have the save range of values, thus no room for storing time zone info. The text of the page confirms this. Something of a misnomer: "without tz" means "ignore offset when inserting data" and "with tz" means "use offset to adjust to UTC". –  Basil Bourque Feb 15 '14 at 9:51
3  
The data types are a misnomer in a second way: They say "time zone" but actually we are talking about offset from UTC/GMT. A time zone is actually an offset plus rules/history about Daylight Saving Time (DST) and other anomalies. –  Basil Bourque Feb 15 '14 at 9:52

Here is an example that should help. If you have a timestamp with a timezone, you can convert that timestamp into any other timezone. If you haven't got a base timezone it won't be converted correctly.

SELECT now(), now()::timestamp, now() AT TIME ZONE 'CST', now()::timestamp AT TIME ZONE 'CST'
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