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I installed Ruby 1.9.2. I used rvm use 1.9.2 and then when I type ruby -v it says 1.9.2. Then when I quit terminal and reopen it, it says 1.8.7 again.

What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your default ruby is most likely not set to ruby 1.9.2. Try:

rvm --default use 1.9.2

Also if you want to see all ruby versions installed, you can run 'rvm list'. The default ruby is prefixed with a => symbol, as shown below.

$ rvm list

rvm rubies

   ruby-1.9.1-p243 [ x86_64 ]
=> ruby-1.9.2-p136 [ x86_64 ]
   ruby-1.9.2-p180 [ x86_64 ]
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Yes, that worked...but I think that some stuff is still looking in 1.8...hence: MacBook-Air: beatjunkie84$ rails server /Library/Ruby/Site/1.8/rubygems.rb:926:in report_activate_error': Could not find RubyGem rails (>= 0) (Gem::LoadError) from /Library/Ruby/Site/1.8/rubygems.rb:244:in activate_dep' from /Library/Ruby/Site/1.8/rubygems.rb:236:in activate' from /Library/Ruby/Site/1.8/rubygems.rb:1307:in gem' from /usr/bin/rails:18 –  Matthew Berman May 3 '11 at 23:19
    
I don't think this is related. I believe you are running ruby 1.9.2 (assuming you ran the above command). Did you install rails? In your Gemfile, you'll need to add gem 'rails', then run 'bundle install', then try starting your server again. –  mbreining May 3 '11 at 23:23

Once you switch over using rvm --default use 1.9.2, be sure to check your gem list. Once you switch over, your gem list will be almost empty.

Additionally, you can check to see more information regarding what version of ruby and gemset you're using with the command rvm info.

If it is in fact empty, simply install rails with the command gem install rails. Be sure to not use sudo with this command.

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