Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working with a class that has lots of properties. For example;

public class Bib
{        
    public int PartQty { get; set; }
}

Now to unit test; I did the xUnit test something like

    [Fact]
    public void CanGetAndSetPartQuantity()
    {
        const int expected = 3;

        var target = new Bib() {PartQty = expected};

        Assert.Equal(expected, target.PartQty);
    }

here, I hate how I am hard-coding expected = 3. What's a good way to test this property for accessor and mutator?

share|improve this question
1  
You might be using a "magic number" but at least you're only stating it once in the test - so I'm hard-pressed to see what the problem is here. –  Will A May 3 '11 at 23:14
16  
Do you expect the .NET Framework to stop working? I would not recommend writing tests for automatic properties. –  TrueWill May 3 '11 at 23:18
2  
Contrary to public opinion here, when producing a library this kind of test is quite valid. No so much that is succeeds but that it compiles without error. A unit test performs both functions. –  Rick Sladkey May 3 '11 at 23:32
2  
It would compile without error even without the unit test, assuming the property is ever used. And if it is not used, then it should not exist. –  John Saunders May 3 '11 at 23:40
4  
When producing a library, this kind of test is quite valid because you might decide at some later point in time to have more complicated getter or setter logic for the property, and the test will ensure that you don't break anything when that time comes. –  Ken Bloom May 3 '11 at 23:43
show 7 more comments

7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Constrained Non-determinism is a good fit for this kind of unit test. Write it like this instead:

[Fact]
public void CanGetAndSetPartQuantity()
{
    const int expected = new Random().Next();

    var target = new Bib() {PartQty = expected};

    Assert.Equal(expected, target.PartQty);
}

This ensures that the output correctly represents the input, no matter what the input is.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since this property has no behavior other than being a getter/setter for an integer, you're essentially just testing that the compiler worked. This adds basically no value to your test. Consider removing it entirely. That would alleviate you of this odd situation. :)

If you do have some behavior you're trying to capture (e.g., allowed boundary conditions) you only need to test those, and really nothing else. Usually you will have constants for those boundary conditions available as part of the object. Consider using those constants, +/- some appropriate increment.

share|improve this answer
4  
I can't agree with this. If we are talking about TDD there's no guarantee that a writable property works. The argument about 'only testing that the compiler works' infers that the test knows something about the internal implementation of the SUT. This should not be the case. –  Mark Seemann May 4 '11 at 7:30
add comment

I'm a firm believer in having unit tests be 'white-box' tests, which means you are allowed to use known corner cases to choose your test inputs. In this particular, case, with an auto-property, the test is unnecessary if you trust your compiler. If you can't trust the compiler to implement an auto-property the way you expect, then you can't trust it to execute the test as you've written, either.

That said, if you have a more complex setter, you would choose your inputs based on the possible failure cases. A few typical cases:

  • Negative numbers for properties that validate >= 0
  • Other validation failures
  • Extreme boundary cases like Int.MaxValue which can sometimes trigger overflows and unexpected behavior in the setter
  • An arbitrary value that should pass validation (no real guidance on how to choose a value here, as long as you know it's in your 'good' case.)
share|improve this answer
add comment

This should help...

[Fact]     
public void CanGetAndSetPartQuantity()     
{
    bool fail = false;
    int expected = 0;

    while (!fail && expected < int.MaxValue)
    {
        var target = new Bib() {PartQty = expected};          
        fail = expected != target.PartQty;
        expected++;
    }

    Assert.IsTrue(!fail);
} 
share|improve this answer
2  
I assume this is a joke, and NOT something you actually mean for the asker to use. –  Robert P May 3 '11 at 23:41
    
I've edited it so that the test completes after all the positive integers have been tested. It's a rigorous test. –  Kirk Broadhurst May 3 '11 at 23:58
    
You guys have a fantastic sense of humour rolls eyes –  Kirk Broadhurst May 4 '11 at 0:10
1  
+1 because I think you're trying to be funny, and it is, but you should make it clear so you don't get so many down votes. –  Brook May 4 '11 at 0:18
2  
You should change 5th line to int expected = int.MinValue;. And test for values smaller than MinValue and larger than MaxValue. And fractions. –  Patrick Huizinga May 4 '11 at 8:06
show 2 more comments

I wathced a presentation on good unit testing practices a while ago (sorry but the name of the guy escaped my fragile memory). He advocated the use of storing values like that in constants with carefully selected names.

In your case, I would use a name like

const int SomeRandomValidPartQuantity=3;

By this, you signal the intention of using exactly this value, and in this case you are just after any valid quantity.

share|improve this answer
    
I use this pattern, but typically make the constants local to the method (this way I don't end up with a cluttered list of constants in the test class.) I also like to use this pattern when passing a constant boolean value to a method, to give a meaningful interpretation to the boolean value for the purposes of reading the code. –  Dan Bryant May 4 '11 at 14:08
    
@Dan, I also make them local, but elevate them to fixture level if the same type of value (any valid in the example) is needed elsewhere –  Morten May 4 '11 at 18:21
add comment

The test should be derived from some kind of use case. The funny thing is that first you introduced your class, then talked about writing a test, which is backwards to TDD.

The use case informs the test, which informs the code. I highly doubt your use case is "the user of my API can set a property called PartQty to any integer and always get back the integer they set". If that were the real use case, you'd write a unit test that checks int.MaxValue and int.MinValue. However, these are rarely real-world values.

A real-world use case might look like: "the user of my API news up a Bib injecting an IFlugleBinder, sets the PartQty to 4 and then calls the Execute method. This calls the Bind method on the IFlugleBinder instance 4 times." If that was the use case, your test would look very different.

Honestly it looks like Bib is just a DTO of some kind. In my experience, most DTO's are just an artifact of some higher level use case. If the DTO is returned as some result of a function call that your API provides, then you should really be returning an interface, and the DTO class itself should be private, in which case it's not necessary to test it explicitly (just test the properties of the actual result you get from the method call). Likewise, if it's an internal DTO that's never exposed, then don't make it public. If your user has to provide some bundle of values, then your API should be accepting an interface. Let the user define their own class that implements the interface, or provide an immutable one, like this:

public class Bib : IBib
{
    public Bib(int partQty)
    {
        PartQty = partQty;
    }
    public int PartQty { get; private set; }
}

Then you can write a test that checks if your constructor works if you want to be pedantic, but it's not that important.

share|improve this answer
add comment

While I also believe this falls under the "Test till bored" category, if you indeed feel this is worth testing, approval tests offers a very simple way to test. Attached is a simple test to check properties.

[TestMethod]
[UseReporter(typeof(DiffReporter))]
public void TestMethod1()
{
    var fred = new Person{
            Age = 35,
        FirstName = "fred",
        LastName = "Flintstone",
        Hair = Color.Black
           };
    Approvals.Verify(fred.WritePropertiesToString());
}

This will produce a file that reads:

Person
{
    Age: 35
    FirstName: fred
    LastName: Flintstone
    Hair: Color [Black]
}

Simply rename that file to .approved and you're done.

Note the use of the extension method: .WritePropertiesToString()

There a video about the basics of approval tests here for

MsTest: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg8GOmlwqYY

Nunit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO_fyZBxaFk

Xunit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wPx0O4gFzc

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.