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I'm used to java, objective c and a little c++. Now i want to use PHP to create a website. I created several classes but to keep it simple: 3 classes.

Account - DataMapper - DataManager

This means that i can get an account from the database. In DataManager i keep track of all things. Like the userId of the user.

The thing is, normally all setted variables stay 'set', but now i'm using php i apperently need to store them by using a session. DataManager:

<? php
class DataManager
{
    // Hold an instance of the class
    private static $dm;
    private $dataMapper;
    private $dictationView;
    private $userId;

    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->dataMapper = new DataMapper();
        $this->dictationView = new DictationView();
    }

    // The singleton method
    public static function singleton()
    {
        if (!isset(self::$dm)) {
            $c = __CLASS__;
            self::$dm = new $c;
        }

        return self::$dm;
    }

    // Prevent users to clone the instance
    public function __clone()
    {
        trigger_error('Clone is not allowed.', E_USER_ERROR);
    }


    function __get($prop) {
        return $this->$prop;
        }

    function __set($prop, $val) {
        $this->$prop = $val;
        }
}

?>

If i set the userId in the singleton DataManager class, the next time i call an instance of the DataManager class it will not rememeber the userId. Somewhere i have to deal with session i guess. How to use sessions in a good OOP way in the DataManager? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
When you say "the next time", do you mean in the same request or a subsequent one? Remember, PHP is essentially as stateless as HTTP. Also, use self::$dm = new self; instead of $c = __CLASS__; self::$dm = new $c; –  Phil May 3 '11 at 23:40
    
@Phil Brown PHP is not stateless, every language will be stateless between requests in a server-client architect which handle every request in a different process. PHP can have a state just as any other language. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 3 '11 at 23:55
    
@Itay What I was referring to is that PHP does not have a container like Tomcat. You can of course maintain state using sessions and other external storage but if you're coming from Java, these things might not be obvious. –  Phil May 4 '11 at 0:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want you can create a wrapper for sessions in PHP. It actually could be beneficial, especially if your application later had to migrate to a cluster of servers and sessions would be moved to a distributed cache. Then, to facilitate this migration you would only have to provide different implementation if same Session class interface.

That said.

This code there itself is not a good OOP. You should stop using singletons. And, if you class require instances of DataMapper and DictationView, then they should be created outside the class and provided in the constructor. Instead of creating a tight coupling because you constructor is making other objects.

share|improve this answer

Now, what you refer to is not PHP but rather how a client-server architecture is being handled.

Here is a change, which assumes you manage the session correctly (with regard to session_start - should be in the bootstrap of your file) I have also added some of topic corrections to your code, which will help u in the future:

    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->dataMapper = new DataMapper();
        $this->dictationView = new DictationView();
    }

    // The singleton method
    public static function singleton()
    {
        if(isset($_SESSION[self::MY_UNIQUE_IDENTIFIER] &&
           get_class($_SESSION[self::MY_UNIQUE_IDENTIFIER] == 'DataManager'){
                   self::$dm = $_SESSION[self::MY_UNIQUE_IDENTIFIER];
        }
        if (!self::$dm) {//LOOK HERE LOOK HERE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
           $_SESSION[self::MY_UNIQUE_IDENTIFIER] = self::$dm = new self;
        }

        return self::$dm;
    }

    // Prevent users to clone the instance
    public function __clone()
    {
        trigger_error('Clone is not allowed.', E_USER_ERROR);
    }


    function __get($prop) {
        return $this->$prop;
        }

    function __set($prop, $val) {
        $this->$prop = $val;
        }
}
//LOOK HERE LOOK HERE no closing ?>

Some traps I did not address here as they are not the subject of this question:

  1. The right way to manage sessions
  2. Adjustment to the class to allow inheritance without trashing the session
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alot, but maybe best is to get rid of the singleton class? Shall i just store my sessions in the __get and __set of the class –  Oritm May 4 '11 at 8:08
    
@Oritm that will make it a session wrapper. It does not necessarily have to be a singleton, and although many people are against it, there is always the quiet majority who still uses it without any problems. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 4 '11 at 14:52

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