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Problem:

I would like to be able to use the built-in iOS icons for standard mime types (or UTI types) in my listing of binary file content.

Background:

I have looked into using the new (since 3.2) document architecture, but using the UIDocumentInteractionController it seems that the assumption is that the actual binaries are already on the local device.

In my case I have a file listing from a remote server and know the mime type, name, title, etc for the remote file so I just want to show a file listing with icons (the actual binary is only loaded as needed).

The meta data I get from the server contains proper mime types for the binaries so in theory I just want to get the system icon based on the type.

Work around?

I have tried the following "hack" as a proof of concept and it seems to work but this doesn't seem like the best way to go...

//Need to initialize this way or the doc controller doesn't work
NSURL*fooUrl = [NSURL URLWithString:@"file://foot.dat"];
UIDocumentInteractionController* docController = [[UIDocumentInteractionController interactionControllerWithURL:fooUrl] retain];

UIImage* thumbnail = nil;
//Need to convert from mime type to a UTI to be able to get icons for the document
NSString *uti = [NSMakeCollectable(UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassMIMEType, (CFStringRef)self.contentType, NULL)) autorelease];

//Tell the doc controller what UTI type we want
docController.UTI = uti;

//The doc controller now seems to have icon(s) for the type I ask for...
NSArray* icons = docController.icons;
if([icons count] > 0) {
    thumbnail = [icons objectAtIndex:0];
}
return thumbnail;
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Can you mark stackoverflow.com/a/14880929/9636 as correct? It sounds like it works for people. –  Heath Borders Mar 20 at 14:03

3 Answers 3

I tried Ben Lings's solution, but it didn't work on iOS6.1 in either the simulator or on my iPad3. You need to provide an NSURL to the UIDocumentInteractionController, but that URL doesn't need to exist. Its last path component just needs to have the extension that you want.

The following code worked for me

NSString *extension = @"pptx"; // or something else
NSString *dummyPath = [@"~/foo" stringByAppendingPathExtension:extension]; // doesn't exist
NSURL *URL = [NSURL fileURLWithPath:dummyPath];
UIDocumentInteractionController *documentInteractionController = [UIDocumentInteractionController interactionControllerWithURL:URL];
NSArray *systemIconImages = documentInteractionController.icons;

return systemIconImages;
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This works wonderfully for me on both iOS 6 & 7. –  anas Feb 19 at 16:15
1  
I am using this solution and it worked great but recently I am having a problem for unknown file type. For example, if the file is anyFile.supal it shows dropbox icon (dropbox is installed in my device). Is there any way to get rid of this problem? –  arif Mar 20 at 4:19
1  
I just found the solution -> 1. Edit .plist file 2. Find Doucument types -> Item 0 -> Handler rank 3. Change the value to Owner –  arif Mar 20 at 4:40
1  
doesn't work on ios8 –  Jonathan. Jun 17 at 1:19
    
Please file a radar, and copy it to openradar. I'll duplicate it. –  Heath Borders Jun 17 at 13:51

You can create a UIDocumentInteractionController without needing to specify a URL. The header for the class says the icons are determined by name if set, URL otherwise.

UIDocumentInteractionController* docController = [[UIDocumentInteractionController alloc] init];
docController.name = @"foo.dat";
NSArray* icons = docController.icons;
// Do something with icons
...
[docController release];
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Thanks, this works perfect and should be the accepted answer! –  auco Dec 18 '12 at 15:57
1  
This doesn't seem to work in iOS 6.1. I've tried it on both the simulator and device. –  Heath Borders Feb 14 '13 at 17:24
    
Just tried this on an iOS 7 project in the simulator. The debugger shows me the array with UIMappedBitmapImage values as expected. –  Martin de Keijzer Nov 8 '13 at 11:29

So we are talking about hacks uh? I did this by doing some bad stuff, but it's working... I copied the icons from /system/library/frameworks/QuickLook.framework and added to my project. Inside this same folder, there is some property lists, that make the link between the UTI/extension/mime-type with the png file. With the plist and the pngs, all you have to do is make a logic to read the plists and show the correct png.

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Yeah ideally I was hoping that a more official approach was out there without any hacking. But thanks for the details on where the underlying icons are coming from. I had not dug into that. –  John K May 31 '11 at 11:01
    
hi, "/system/library/frameworks/QuickLook.framework" you refere to Mac or iPhone? Thanks –  Cullen SUN Feb 13 '12 at 8:09
    
This suggestion has two issues: 1. it does not consider the icons present on the user's device (if a specific app is installed to handle a particular file type) and 2. using icons from Apple can result in a rejection, as it is clearly a violation against the rules. –  auco Dec 18 '12 at 16:00

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