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This is a design question, not a bug fix problem.

The situation is this. I have a lot of collections and objects contained in one class. Their contents are only changed by a single message handler thread. There is one other thread which is doing rendering. Each frame it iterates through some of these collections and draws to the screen based on the value of these objects. It does not alter the objects in any way, it is just reading their values.

Now when the rendering is being done, if any of the collections are altered, my foreach loops in the rendering method fail. How should I make this thread safe? Edit: So I have to lock the collections outside each foreach loop I run on them. This works, but it seems like a lot of repetitive code to solve this problem.

As a short, contrived example:

class State
{
    public object LockObjects;
    public List<object> Objects;

    // Called by message handler thread
    void HandleMessage()
    {
        lock (LockObjects)
        {
            Objects.Add(new object());
        }
    }
}

class Renderer
{
    State m_state;

    // Called by rendering thread
    void Render()
    {
        lock (m_state.LockObjects)
        {
            foreach (var obj in m_state.Objects)
            {
                DrawObject(obj);
            }
        }
    }
}

This is all well and good, but I'd rather not put locks on all my state collections if there's a better way. Is this "the right" way to do it or is there a better way?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The better way is to use begin/end methods and separated lists for your both threads and synchronization using auto events for example. It will be lock-free to your message handler thread and enables you to have a lot of render/message handler threads:

class State : IDisposable
{
    private List<object> _objects;

    private ReaderWriterLockSlim _locker;

    private object _cacheLocker;
    private List<object> _objectsCache;

    private Thread _synchronizeThread;
    private AutoResetEvent _synchronizationEvent;
    private bool _abortThreadToken;

    public State()
    {
        _objects = new List<object>();
        _objectsCache = new List<object>();

        _cacheLocker = new object();
        _locker = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

        _synchronizationEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

        _abortThreadToken = false;

        _synchronizeThread = new Thread(Synchronize);
        _synchronizeThread.Start();
    }


    private void Synchronize()
    {
        while (!_abortThreadToken)
        {
            _synchronizationEvent.WaitOne();

            int objectsCacheCount;
            lock (_cacheLocker)
            {
                objectsCacheCount = _objectsCache.Count;
            }

            if (objectsCacheCount > 0)
            {
                _locker.EnterWriteLock();

                lock (_cacheLocker)
                {
                    _objects.AddRange(_objectsCache);
                    _objectsCache.Clear();
                }

                _locker.ExitWriteLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<object> GetEnumerator()
    {
        _locker.EnterReadLock();

        foreach (var o in _objects)
        {
            yield return o;
        }

        _locker.ExitReadLock();
    }

    // Called by message handler thread
    public void HandleMessage()
    {
        lock (_cacheLocker)
        {
            _objectsCache.Add(new object());
        }

        _synchronizationEvent.Set();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _abortThreadToken = true;
        _synchronizationEvent.Set();
    }
}

Or (the simpler way) you can use ReaderWriteerLockSlim (Or just locks if you sure you have only one reader) like in the following code:

class State
{
    List<object> m_objects = new List<object>();

    ReaderWriterLockSlim locker = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();
    public IEnumerator<object> GetEnumerator()
    {
        locker.EnterReadLock();

        foreach (var o in Objects)
        {
            yield return o;
        }

        locker.ExitReadLock();
    }

    private List<object> Objects
    {
        get { return m_objects; }
        set { m_objects = value; }
    }

    // Called by message handler thread
    public void HandleMessage()
    {
        locker.EnterWriteLock();

        Objects.Add(new object());

        locker.ExitWriteLock();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Without the locks, I will (occasionally) get "InvalidOperationException -- Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute." on the "in" keyword. – Philip May 4 '11 at 0:45
    
You will get the same error with your current code (with that locks). Try to run it in high-concurrent mode. – oxilumin May 4 '11 at 0:47
    
You're right, my locks need to be outside the foreach loop. So much for my contrived example, I've edited it to what works. – Philip May 4 '11 at 0:49
    
RWLS only adds overhead with only one writer and one reader. Worse, actually, this code is highly exception unsafe. – Hans Passant May 4 '11 at 1:04
    
I tried the ReaderWriterLockSlim to check for performance issues and it seems good enough for my purpose. We'll see, thanks. – Philip May 4 '11 at 1:06

Humm... have you tried with a ReaderWriterLockSlim ? Enclose each conllection with one of this, and ensure you start a read or write operation each time you access it.

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