Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a solution with several projects in it. One of the projects is a collection of common code that will drive several different client applications and a server application. I have a namespace Common that is in a project by itself. This namespace has several public functions: Formater and UnFormater. These functions work fine across the various other projects. However, in some projects I would like to be able to overload these functions. The overloads would take a data structure unique to only that specific project and mutate it in to a format that the Common Formater and UnFormater can understand and then pass the work off to them to get done.

This has several advantages. I like being able to have the common parts of my code all in one place, but I would also like to overload them to make them easier to use in the various projects with custom data types.

To demonstrate (sample code):

Project 1:

Namespace Common
    Public Module FormatingServices
        Public Function Formater(ByVal DataToFormat As String) As String
            'format the data
        End Function

        Public Function UnFormater(ByVal DataToUnFormat As String) As String
            'unformat the data
        End Function
    End Module
End Namespace

Project 2:

Namespace Common
    Public Module FormattingServices
        Public Function Formater(ByVal DataToFormat As StringBuilder) As String
            Dim myString As String = DataToFormat.ToString
            Return Formater(myString)
        End Function

        Public Function UnFormater(ByVal DataToUnFormat As StringBuilder) As String
            Dim myString As String = DataToUnFormat.ToString
            Return UnFormater(myString)
        End Function
    End Module
End Namespace

In Project 2 on myString in both Functions I get the following error:

"Value of type 'String' cannot be converted to 'System.Text.StringBuilder'.

How do I get this to work? Is it even possible?

UPDATE:

Here is the solution that I have so far. Can someone explain why this works and the above doesn't? A bunch of Shared Functions should be the same as functions in a module, so I don't understand.

Project 1:

Public Class FormattingServices
    Public Shared Function Formatter(ByVal myString As String) As String
        Return myString & myString
    End Function
End Class

Project 2:

Imports System.Text

Namespace Common
    Public Class FormattingServices
        Inherits ClassLibrary1.FormattingServices
        Public Overloads Shared Function Formatter(ByVal myString As StringBuilder) As String
            Return Formatter(myString.ToString)
        End Function
    End Class
End Namespace

Project 3:

Imports ClassLibrary2.Common.FormattingServices
Imports System.Text

Module Module1

    Sub Main()
        Console.WriteLine("String Test: " & Formatter("This is a test string."))
        Console.WriteLine("StringBuilder Test: " & Formatter(New StringBuilder("This is a test StringBuilder string.")))
        Console.Read()
    End Sub

End Module
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You can't treat two types that are two different assemblies with the same name as though they were the same class.

You'll need to include the Project name with the namespace when you want to reference the correct object. Project1.Common.Formater and Project2.Common.Formater (Side note C# handles this a little differently as it has a Global qualifier that you can change instead)

However based on what you're going for I think you might want to take a different approach altogether. It looks like you want your calling code to tell your Formater how to act for some parts of its logic but not all. This is typically done using Inversion of Control or Dependency Injection.

In my view Dependency Injection is a little easier to start with as it has a low concept count.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree it shouldn't generate an error, but it does. I've written all the code anew and referenced it. It is all in a single solution. If I take the namespace off Project 2 I can call Common.Formater and Common.UnFormater just fine. –  cjbarth May 4 '11 at 2:59
    
@cjbarth. If I understand you do mean to say you have two types with exactly the same name including namespaces in two different assemblies? –  Conrad Frix May 4 '11 at 3:14
    
@ConradFrix. Correct. In a single solution I have Project 1 and Project 2. Project 1 has namespace Common with Function Formater (which I just realized I spelled wrong) and Project 2 has namespace Common with function Formater that overloads the Formater in Project 1. If these were in the same project they would work fine being overloaded as they are, but since the are in two different projects I'm getting errors. –  cjbarth May 4 '11 at 3:18
    
@cjbarth looks like I did indeed misunderstand you question. I updated my answer I hope it helps. –  Conrad Frix May 4 '11 at 3:49
    
@ConradFrix Thanks for your explanation. I had imagined that I could just use overloads anywhere and that the compiler would be smart enough to find the only one in my entire codebase that matched and use that one. Seems silly that it can't do that for me. I will look in to your suggestions and provide feedback. –  cjbarth May 4 '11 at 12:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.