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Suppose I have:

Operand[2][4] = {{"1", "2", "3", "4"},{"5", "6", "7", "8"}};

and I have some bit variables called Operand1_sign and Operand2_sign (0: positive and 1: negative) suppose they are:

Operand1_sign = 0;
Operand2_sign = 1;

How can I convert this into 2 integers and apply some operation on them (such as summation)

i.e.

signed int Operand1, Operand2, Result;

so finally I can get the following:

Operand1 = + 1234;
Operand2 = - 5678;
Result = Operand1 + Operand2;
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2  
int atoi (const char * str) ?, see cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/atoi –  Zifei Tong May 4 '11 at 2:37
1  
I didn't notice that you'd included the 'homework' tag. Am I missing something? –  Pete Wilson May 4 '11 at 2:40
    
This is just a small part of project on PIC18 –  Eng.Fouad May 4 '11 at 2:41
    
@Tong: How can I enter Operand[][] as a parameter of atoi() ? Sorry, I'm used to JAVA and I'm new at C :) –  Eng.Fouad May 4 '11 at 2:49
2  
BTW, atoi will fail since the Operand values aren't 0-terminated. It would work if you had char Operand[2][5] = {{'1', '2', '3', '4', '\0'},{'5', '6', '7', '8', '\0'}}; –  Joce May 4 '11 at 2:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I could suggest this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int my_atoi(char* operand, int bufsize, int sign)
{
    char* value = new char[bufsize+1];
    memcpy(value, operand, bufsize);
    value[bufsize] = '\0';
    int ret = 0;
    sscanf(value, "%d", &ret);
    if (sign < 0)
    {
        ret = -ret;
    }
    delete [] value;
    return ret;
}

void main()
{
    char Operand[2][4] = {{'1', '2', '3', '4'},{'5', '6', '7', '8'}};
    signed int Operand1 = my_atoi(Operand[0], 4, 1);
    signed int Operand2 = my_atoi(Operand[1], 4, -1);
    signed int Result = Operand1 + Operand2;
}

However, I would definitely recommend you get your strings as null terminated strings. In that case, you could skip the manual implementation of my_atoi, and just do:

#include <stdlib.h>

void main()
{
    char Operand[2][5] = {{'1', '2', '3', '4', '\0'},{'5', '6', '7', '8', '\0'}};
    signed int Operand1 = atoi(Operand[0]);
    signed int Operand2 = -atoi(Operand[1]);
    signed int Result = Operand1 + Operand2;
}
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is there any library I should import to get this worked? –  Eng.Fouad May 4 '11 at 3:16

Instead of answering, I'll give you a clue: the number 1234 can also be expressed as 1 * 1000 + 2*100 + 3*10 + 4*1 - this is the key to parsing numbers :)

share|improve this answer
    
But this technique seems to be working only on fixed length-arrays. In my project, at every time I have different inputs so the array won't be fixed (actually it has maximum 13) –  Eng.Fouad May 4 '11 at 2:54
    
This works on non-fixed length arrays too with a bit of cleverness - you're right that you can't directly apply this –  Paul Betts May 4 '11 at 2:57
    
@Eng.Fouad you never mentioned that Operand could be of variable size in your question. –  Joce May 4 '11 at 3:03
    
I was looking for converting char[] to int, and I said it's OK I could apply it on variable size of array –  Eng.Fouad May 4 '11 at 3:08
    
"Suppose I have: Operand[2][4]". That's pretty much fixed. Also, I would really avoid doing the parsing yourself. There are functions in the standard library for that already. –  Joce May 4 '11 at 3:13

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