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If s is a std::string, then is there a function like the following?

s.replace("text to replace", "new text");
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2  
4  
There is no such direct replace, but it should have been there. I was also searching for the same for a long time. –  iammilind May 4 '11 at 5:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Try a combination of std::string::find and std::string::replace.

This gets the position:

size_t f = s.find("text to replace");

And this replaces the text:

s.replace(f, std::string("text to replace").length(), "new text");

Now you can simply create a function for your convenience:

std::string myreplace(std::string &s,
                      std::string toReplace,
                      std::string replaceWith)
{
    return(s.replace(s.find(toReplace), toReplace.length(), replaceWith));
}
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1  
if "text to replace" is longer or shorter than the length of the "new text", what will the string::replace do? memmove the string to fill the gap? –  Alcott Sep 16 '11 at 2:25
    
@Alcott It'll allocate memory for a "new" string of the correct size, fill in the data, and delete the "old" string. –  Mateen Ulhaq Sep 16 '11 at 2:45
    
This is fine to do just one, a function to replace all of them is a bit more complex. –  CashCow Jan 7 at 15:55

Yes: replace_all is one of the boost string algorithms:

Although it's not a standard library, it has a few things on the standard library:

  1. More natural notation based on ranges rather than iterator pairs. This is nice because you can nest string manipulations (e.g., replace_all nested inside a trim). That's a bit more involved for the standard library functions.
  2. Completeness. This isn't hard to be 'better' at; the standard library is fairly spartan. For example, the boost string algorithms give you explicit control over how string manipulations are performed (i.e., in place or through a copy).
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+1: this boost library seems little known, yet it's perhaps the one I use the most. –  Matthieu M. May 4 '11 at 6:24
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    string str("one three two four");
    string str2("three");
    str.replace(str.find(str2),str2.length(),"five");
    cout << str << endl;
    return 0;
}

Output

one five two four
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Do we really need a Boost library for seemingly such a simple task?

To replace all occurences of a substring use this function:

std::string ReplaceString(std::string subject, const std::string& search,
                          const std::string& replace) {
    size_t pos = 0;
    while ((pos = subject.find(search, pos)) != std::string::npos) {
         subject.replace(pos, search.length(), replace);
         pos += replace.length();
    }
    return subject;
}

If you need performance, here is an optimized function that modifies the input string, it does not create a copy of the string:

void ReplaceStringInPlace(std::string& subject, const std::string& search,
                          const std::string& replace) {
    size_t pos = 0;
    while ((pos = subject.find(search, pos)) != std::string::npos) {
         subject.replace(pos, search.length(), replace);
         pos += replace.length();
    }
}

Tests:

std::string input = "abc abc def";
std::cout << "Input string: " << input << std::endl;

std::cout << "ReplaceString() return value: " 
          << ReplaceString(input, "bc", "!!") << std::endl;
std::cout << "ReplaceString() input string not modified: " 
          << input << std::endl;

ReplaceStringInPlace(input, "bc", "??");
std::cout << "ReplaceStringInPlace() input string modified: " 
          << input << std::endl;

Output:

Input string: abc abc def
ReplaceString() return value: a!! a!! def
ReplaceString() input string not modified: abc abc def
ReplaceStringInPlace() input string modified: a?? a?? def
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1  
I say: yes, because it replaces your own code with peer-reviewed code. The same reason you're using std::string and std::cout. Now, if you're trying to reduce dependencies, that's another question. –  strickli Aug 19 '13 at 19:57
    
The issue with replace() being called many times is that each time it might be moving the right hand part of the string (assuming the "replace" is not the same length as the "find". Therefore if memory is not an issue I'd prefer to write everything to a new string. –  CashCow Jan 7 at 15:54

like some say boost::replace_all

here a dummy example:

    #include <boost/algorithm/string/replace.hpp>

    std::string path("file.gz");
    boost::replace_all(path, ".gz", ".zip");
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Not exactly that, but std::string has many replace overloaded functions.

Go through this link to see explanation of each, with examples as to how they're used.

Also, there are several versions of string::find functions (listed below) which you can use in conjunction with string::replace.

  • find
  • rfind
  • find_first_of
  • find_last_of
  • find_first_not_of
  • find_last_not_of

Also, note that there are several versions of replace functions available from <algorithm> which you can also use (instead of string::replace):

  • replace
  • replace_if
  • replace_copy
  • replace_copy_if
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1  
This does not answer the question. –  Tom Swirly Mar 2 '14 at 21:16
    
find or rfind are the only appropriate ones. std::replace works for string only if it is char-to-char replace i.e. replacing all the spaces with underscores or whatever. –  CashCow Jan 7 at 15:56
// replaced text will be in buffer.
void Replace(char* buffer, const char* source, const char* oldStr,  const char* newStr)
{
    if(buffer==NULL || source == NULL || oldStr == NULL || newStr == NULL) return; 

    int slen = strlen(source);
    int olen = strlen(oldStr);
    int nlen = strlen(newStr);

    if(olen>slen) return;
    int ix=0;

    for(int i=0;i<slen;i++)
    {
        if(oldStr[0] == source[i])
        {
            bool found = true;
            for(int j=1;j<olen;j++)
            {
                if(source[i+j]!=oldStr[j])
                {
                    found = false;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if(found)
            {
                for(int j=0;j<nlen;j++)
                    buffer[ix++] = newStr[j];

                i+=(olen-1);
            }
            else
            {
                buffer[ix++] = source[i];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            buffer[ix++] = source[i];
        }
    }
}
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Nice function, but doesn't handle squeezing space characters very well. For example, replace two spaces with one space would have to be run multiple times to get just one space between characters in some cases. –  swdev Apr 25 '14 at 7:42

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