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Do you think mocking objects in JUnit test is a bests practice? I don't see the big advantage. Sure if you have a database which should not be considered in your test it makes sense, but why isn't just injected an other implementation of that component (if spring is used). An object factory for the tests would make this much easy. I don't have much experience (we are using Mockito), but I've already seen, that application code gets modified so that some properties gets mockable! Test cases should never efford such changes in productive code in my oppinion.

So what do you think of this topic? In which cases do you are mocking your object or why you don't?

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closed as not constructive by Janak Nirmal, Ed Staub, Mac, Dominik Honnef, carlosfigueira Nov 20 '12 at 23:54

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The idea of mocking is that you totally isolate the thing that you are testing. Then, when the test fails you can be sure where the problem is without having to hunt through the whole class dependency tree. If you are testing the behaviour of multiple classes together then this is not really unit testing.

An object factory for the tests would presumably make objects with stubbed methods, and the mocking frameworks are essentially generic object factories for use in tests. But mocks provide a lot more than stubs do - a difference which Martin Fowler goes into detail on here: http://martinfowler.com/articles/mocksArentStubs.html.

If you find mocking arduous, and you also find that you are doing a lot of it, then that is a classic example of TDD telling you that your design could be improved.

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I've already seen, that application code gets modified so that some properties gets mockable! Test cases should never efford such changes in productive code in my oppinion.

The core idea of TDD is that by forcing you to make all your code testable, the design in general will become better. This doesn't necessarily mean just to have everything mockable, it could also mean reducing coupling so that less mocking is necessary.

Even if you don't agree with that philosophy (I don't buy it 100% myself), as long as you believe that automated tests provide value, then changing the production code to support that value makes sense (unless it seriously compromises the design in some other way).

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  • Defines calibrating classes interfaces (interface discovery)
  • Allows top to bottom design
  • Isolation (unit testing)
  • Clarifies the interactions between classes
  • Sometimes the only way to see if object does what you want( Mocks and Tell Don’t Ask)
  • Encouraged better structured tests. For example, jukito auto-injects mocks to enable you to focus on things you rely want to test.
  • Allows preserving encapsulation
  • Reduces dependencies

  • Value object should not be mocked

Mocking frameworks grow-out from necessity. As Matthew Gilliard said, if there is some kind of mockery going on, then it is sign that design can be improved or lack of test focus. Tests reveals lots of problems in code.

but why isn't just injected an other implementation of that component (if spring is used).

You have to write implementation. Using mocking framework it is done for you.

I've already seen, that application code gets modified so that some properties gets mockable! Test cases should never effort such changes in productive code in my opinion.

If mockable means testable then it is other way around. For example, in TDD test defines production code.

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I think the real question is whether unit testing is a best practice or not. If you believe it is, then the use of mocking is a necessity, from the point of view of having a tested unit isolated from the implementation of its dependencies.

There is some confusion in how this relates to the concept of testability, though. Complicated, convoluted code is not testable essentially because it is hard to understand. Well-factored code that has a clean and simple design is generally easier to understand and maintain; why should it be hard to unit test, then?

The confusion arises from certain arbitrary limitations found in some mocking tools, such as the inability to mock final or static methods, or the need to have the tested unit directly use mock objects created in test code. Other mocking tools don't have these limitations, and therefore don't require that "application code gets modified so that some properties get mockable". With modern programming languages/platforms (Java, C#, Python, Ruby, etc.) everything is mockable; it's just a matter of exposing this power in a mocking API, and it has already been done for each of those languages (in the interest of full disclosure, I develop one such tool).

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