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The only model that I can come up with for running multiple similar processes (SIMD) using Java Futures (java.util.concurrent.Future<T>) is as follows:

class Job extends Callable<T> {
  public T call() {
    // ...
  }
}
List<Job> jobs = // ...
List<Future<T>> futures = ExecutorService.invokeAll(jobs);
for (Future<T> future : futures) {
  T t = future.get();
  // Do something with t ...
}

The problem with this model is that if job 0 takes a long time to complete, but jobs 1, 2, and 3 have already completed, the for loop will wait to get the return value from job 0.

Is there any model that allows me to get each Future result as it becomes available without just calling Future.isDone() and busy waiting (or calling Thread.sleep()) if none are ready yet?

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I'd say the answer, as you have hinted at, is to use the isDone() method as a guard for the get() method. Sounds like the ExecutorService itself would benefit from being able to give you the completed jobs, but I don't think that's an option. Can you not do something in the Job which calls back when it completes? –  planetjones May 4 '11 at 11:03
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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can try out the ExecutorCompletionService:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ExecutorCompletionService.html

You would simply submit your tasks and call take until you've received all Futures.

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I was not aware of ExecutorCompletionService. I'll have to take a look at this. –  Ralph May 4 '11 at 11:30
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Consider using ListenableFuture from Guava. They let you basically add a continuation to execute when the future has completed.

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Why don't you add what you want done to the job?

class Job extends Runnable {
  public void run() {
    // ...
    T result = ....
    // do something with the result.
  }
}

That way it will process the result as soon as it is available, concurrently. ;)

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That won't work if the receiver is a Swing GUI. I suppose you could use SwingUtilities.invokeLater(), but suppose you want to update a progress bar -- gets complicated. –  Ralph May 4 '11 at 11:29
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A CompletionService can be polled for available results.

If all you want is the results as they become available however, we wrote an AsyncCompleter that abstracts away the detail of completion service usage. It lets you submit an Iterable<Callable<T>> of jobs and returns an Iterable<T> of results that blocks on next() and returns the results in completion order.

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See the answer by Thomas Jungblut above. The ExecutorCompletionService may do the same thing as your AsyncCompleter. –  Ralph May 5 '11 at 10:51
    
AsyncCompleter wraps an ExecutorCompletionService under the covers and handles all the . The interface is simply: AsyncCompleter.invokeAll(Iterable<Callable<T> jobs) which returns an Iterable<T> of results which blocks on calls to next(). It doesn't declare InterruptedExceptions, you don't poll(). In short, it is much simpler to use than the CompletionService. –  Jed Wesley-Smith May 12 '11 at 22:20
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