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Database:

Transaction  ProductID
 1              1000
 2              1000
 2              1001 
 3              1000
 3              1002
 4              1000
 4              1001
 5              1003

In the above table, how to find this result with a T-SQL statement?

+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
| PRODUCTID1  | PRODUCTID2|     SUPPORT     |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1000   |   1001    |         2       |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1000   |   1002    |         1       |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1000   |   1003    |         0       |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1001   |   1002    |         0       |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1001   |   1003    |         0       |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+
|      1002   |   1003    |         0       |,
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+

Test Table:

create table transactions(
   ORDERID    INT,
   PRODUCTID INT
);

insert into transactions(ORDERID, PRODUCTID)
values ('1', '1000')
      ,('2', '1000')
      ,('2', '1001')
      ,('3', '1000')
      ,('3', '1002')
      ,('4', '1000')
      ,('4', '1001'),
       ('5', '1003');

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
@marc_s: Apriori is the name of the algorithm OP wants to use: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apriori_algorithm –  Gabe May 7 '11 at 3:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Can you infer the zeros? i.e. can we just say that anything not listed is zero? if so:

select t1.PRODUCTID as [PRODUCTID1], t2.PRODUCTID as [PRODUCTID2],
       COUNT(1) as [SUPPORT]
from transactions t1 inner join transactions t2
  on t1.ORDERID = t2.ORDERID
  and t1.PRODUCTID < t2.PRODUCTID
group by t1.PRODUCTID, t2.PRODUCTID

With output:

PRODUCTID1  PRODUCTID2  SUPPORT
----------- ----------- -----------
1000        1001        2
1000        1002        1
share|improve this answer
    
yes, i don't need records which contains zero support. –  Ozkan Koylu May 4 '11 at 12:41
    
i wonder one more thing. how to find 3's combination of this. according to your result (for first row); {1000,1001,1002 } and {1000,1001,1003} –  Ozkan Koylu May 4 '11 at 12:45
    
@wide - you could try whacking in a second join using the same pattern - but it starts to get messy. Really you'd need to give specific data examples to check the result (there are no transactions spanning the 3 at the moment) –  Marc Gravell May 4 '11 at 12:54
    
yes,but sample dataset likes my big database structure.And my database contains 2,3,4 products which sold together. i don't know how to do this. i'm implementing Apriori algorithm. –  Ozkan Koylu May 4 '11 at 13:00

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