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I want to start a gen_server that additionally, will perform one action every minute.

What is the best way to schedule that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 33 down vote accepted

You have two easy alternatives, use timer:send_interval/2 or erlang:send_after/3. send_interval is easier to setup, while send_after (when used in the Erlang module) is more reliable since it is a built-in function, see the Efficiency Guide.

I would recommend something along the following lines in your gen_server:

-define(INTERVAL, 60000). % One minute

init(Args) ->
   ... % Start first timer
   erlang:send_after(?INTERVAL, self(), trigger),
   ...

handle_info(trigger, State) ->
   ... % Do the action
   ... % Start new timer
   erlang:send_after(?INTERVAL, self(), trigger),
   ...

Instead of trigger you could send something with a state if it is needed, like {trigger, Count} or something.

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1  
That's great! It's exactly what I'm doing at the moment. Thanks! –  Piotr Usewicz May 4 '11 at 15:05

There is actually a built-in mechanism within gen_server to accomplish the same thing. If the third element of response tuple of the init, handle_call, handle_cast or handle_info methods in the gen_server is an integer, a timeout message wil be sent to the process after that period of time in millisecs... which should be handled using handle_info. For eg :

init(Args) ->
   ... % Start first timer
   {ok, SomeState, 20000}. %% 20000 is the timeout interval

handle_call(Input, From, State) ->
   ... % Do something
   ... % Do something else
   {reply, SomeState, 20000}. %% 20000 is the timeout interval

handle_cast(Input, State) ->
   ... % Do something
   ... % Do something else
   {noreply, SomeState, 20000}. %% 20000 is the timeout interval


%% A timeout message is sent to the gen_server to be handled in handle_info %%
handle_info(timeout, State) ->
   ... % Do the action
   ... % Start new timer
   {noreply, SomeState, 20000}. %% "timeout" can be sent again after 20000 ms

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any reason why i was given a -1 vote ? –  arun_suresh May 5 '11 at 9:45
    
That is true. Although it means that you have to manipulate the timeout, which might not be a bad idea. –  Piotr Usewicz May 5 '11 at 9:57
6  
timeout is not intended for periodic execution. It is intended to launch some action or terminate when there nothing happen in this period. This timeout is terminated by each action even by some system (sys, proc_lib, ...) actions. Shortly, using timeout is discouraged to rely on except some "maintenance" stuff, like automatic termination or cleanups. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil May 5 '11 at 9:58
    
@Hynek: thanks for clearing that up.. –  arun_suresh May 5 '11 at 14:28

To precisely control the timer, you may want to use erlang:start_timer, and save each timer reference you have created.

erlang:start_timer has a tiny difference with erlang:send_after, see http://www.erlang.org/doc/man/erlang.html#start_timer-3 and http://www.erlang.org/doc/man/erlang.html#send_after-3

Example use case:

init(Args) ->
    ...
    TRef = erlang:start_timer(?INTERVAL, self(), trigger),
    State = #state{tref = TRef},
    ...

handle_info({timeout, _Ref, trigger}, State) ->
    %% With this cancel call we are able to manually send the 'trigger' message 
    %% to re-align the timer, and prevent accidentally setting duplicate timers
    erlang:cancel(State#state.tref),
    ...
    TRef = erlang:start_timer(?INTERVAL, self(), trigger),
    NewState = State#state{tref = TRef},
    ...

handle_cast(stop_timer, State) ->
    TRef = State#state.tref,
    erlang:cancel(TRef),

    %% Remove the timeout message that may have been put in our queue just before 
    %% the call to erlang:cancel, so that no timeout message would ever get 
    %% handled after the 'stop_timer' message
    receive
        {timeout, TRef, _} -> void
        after 0 -> void
    end,
    ...
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There is also the timer module, which could be used.

http://erldocs.com/R14B02/stdlib/timer.html?i=8&search=timer#cancel_timer/1

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