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For caching purposes I need to generate a cache key from GET arguments which are present in a dict.

Currently I'm using sha1(repr(sorted(my_dict.items()))) (sha1() is a convenience method that uses hashlib internally) but I'm curious if there's a better way.

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That seems good to me. –  Devin Jeanpierre May 4 '11 at 13:22
1  
this might not work with nested dict. shortest solution is to use json.dumps(my_dict, sort_keys=True) instead, which will recurse into dict values. –  Andrey Fedorov Apr 8 '14 at 19:15
    
FYI re: dumps, stackoverflow.com/a/12739361/1082367 says "The output from pickle is not guaranteed to be canonical for similar reasons to dict and set order being non-deterministic. Don't use pickle or pprint or repr for hashing." –  Matthew Cornell Dec 16 '14 at 12:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You could make a frozenset with the dict's items and use hash

hash(frozenset(my_dict.items()))

This is much less computationally intensive than generating the JSON string or representation of the dictionary.

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4  
This didn't work for me with a nested dictionary. I haven't tried the solution below (too complicated). The OP's solution works perfectly fine. I substituted sha1 with hash to save an import. –  spatel Jan 18 '12 at 7:51
    
You can also just use hash(tuple(my_dict.items())) to save a few characters for non-nested items. –  Ceasar Bautista Feb 5 '12 at 4:01
4  
@Ceaser That won't work because tuple implies ordering but dict items are unordered. frozenset is better. –  Antimony Jul 30 '12 at 11:55

EDIT: Before continuing to read this answer, please see Jack O'Connor's significantly simpler (and faster) solution below (which also works for hashing nested dictionaries).

Although an answer has been accepted, the title of the question is "Hashing a python dictionary", and the answer is incomplete as regards that title. (As regards the body of the question, the answer is complete.)

Nested Dictionaries

If one searches Stack Overflow for how to hash a dictionary, one might stumble upon this aptly titled question, and leave unsatisfied if one is attempting to hash multiply nested dictionaries. The answer above won't work in this case, and you'll have to implement some sort of recursive mechanism to retrieve the hash.

Here is one such mechanism:

import copy

def make_hash(o):

  """
  Makes a hash from a dictionary, list, tuple or set to any level, that contains
  only other hashable types (including any lists, tuples, sets, and
  dictionaries).
  """

  if isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)):

    return tuple([make_hash(e) for e in o])    

  elif not isinstance(o, dict):

    return hash(o)

  new_o = copy.deepcopy(o)
  for k, v in new_o.items():
    new_o[k] = make_hash(v)

  return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items()))))

Bonus: Hashing Objects and Classes

The hash() function works great when you hash classes or instances. However, here is one issue I found with hash, as regards objects:

class Foo(object): pass
foo = Foo()
print (hash(foo)) # 1209812346789
foo.a = 1
print (hash(foo)) # 1209812346789

The hash is the same, even after I've altered foo. This is because the identity of foo hasn't changed, so the hash is the same. If you want foo to hash differently depending on its current definition, the solution is to hash off whatever is actually changing. In this case, the __dict__ attribute:

class Foo(object): pass
foo = Foo()
print (make_hash(foo.__dict__)) # 1209812346789
foo.a = 1
print (make_hash(foo.__dict__)) # -78956430974785

Alas, when you attempt to do the same thing with the class itself:

print (make_hash(Foo.__dict__)) # TypeError: unhashable type: 'dict_proxy'

The class __dict__ property is not a normal dictionary:

print (type(Foo.__dict__)) # type <'dict_proxy'>

Here is a similar mechanism as previous that will handle classes appropriately:

import copy

DictProxyType = type(object.__dict__)

def make_hash(o):

  """
  Makes a hash from a dictionary, list, tuple or set to any level, that 
  contains only other hashable types (including any lists, tuples, sets, and
  dictionaries). In the case where other kinds of objects (like classes) need 
  to be hashed, pass in a collection of object attributes that are pertinent. 
  For example, a class can be hashed in this fashion:

    make_hash([cls.__dict__, cls.__name__])

  A function can be hashed like so:

    make_hash([fn.__dict__, fn.__code__])
  """

  if type(o) == DictProxyType:
    o2 = {}
    for k, v in o.items():
      if not k.startswith("__"):
        o2[k] = v
    o = o2  

  if isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)):

    return tuple([make_hash(e) for e in o])    

  elif not isinstance(o, dict):

    return hash(o)

  new_o = copy.deepcopy(o)
  for k, v in new_o.items():
    new_o[k] = make_hash(v)

  return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items()))))

You can use this to return a hash tuple of however many elements you'd like:

# -7666086133114527897
print (make_hash(func.__code__))

# (-7666086133114527897, 3527539)
print (make_hash([func.__code__, func.__dict__]))

# (-7666086133114527897, 3527539, -509551383349783210)
print (make_hash([func.__code__, func.__dict__, func.__name__]))

NOTE: all of the above code assumes Python 3.x. Did not test in earlier versions, although I assume make_hash() will work in, say, 2.7.2. As far as making the examples work, I do know that

func.__code__ 

should be replaced with

func.func_code
share|improve this answer
    
isinstance takes a sequence for the second argument, so isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)) would work. –  Xealot Feb 13 '13 at 1:42
    
@Xealot Great thanks for that. Updated. –  jomido Feb 13 '13 at 13:50
    
thanks for making me realize frozenset could consistently hash querystring parameters :) –  Xealot Feb 14 '13 at 14:26
    
The items need to be sorted in order to create the same hash if the dict item order is different but the key values aren't -> return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items())))) –  Bas Koopmans Oct 28 '13 at 13:11
    
@BasKoopmans Thanks. –  jomido Oct 28 '13 at 14:09

Using sorted(d.items()) isn't enough to get us a stable repr. Some of the values in d could be dictionaries too, and their keys will still come out in an arbitrary order. I prefer to use

json.dumps(d, sort_keys=True)

That said, I'm not certain that this is bulletproof. (You might want to add the separators and ensure_ascii arguments to protect yourself from any changes to the defaults there.) I'd appreciate comments.

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1  
This seems like the best solution, but could you expound on why you think separators and ensure_ascii might be useful? –  Andrey Fedorov Apr 8 '14 at 19:13
1  
This is just being paranoid, but JSON allow most characters to show up in strings without any literal escaping, so the encoder gets to make some choices about whether to escape characters or just pass them through. The risk then is that different versions (or future versions) of the encoder could make different escaping choices by default, and then your program would compute different hash values for the same dictionary in different environments. The ensure_ascii argument would protect against this entirely hypothetical problem. –  Jack O'Connor Apr 9 '14 at 4:31
    
Kind of unrelated, but you also need to worry about your encoder's unicode escaping if you plan on evaling the JSON output as literal JS. Fun times. timelessrepo.com/json-isnt-a-javascript-subset –  Jack O'Connor Apr 9 '14 at 4:33
    
thats really neat! one line and you get nested dicts sorted too :) –  Tommaso Barbugli Jul 29 '14 at 16:50
2  
I tested the performance of this with different dataset, it's much much faster than make_hash. gist.github.com/charlax/b8731de51d2ea86c6eb9 –  charlax Sep 18 '14 at 22:33

None of the above answers seem reliable to me. The reason is the use of items(). As far as I know, this comes out in a machine-dependent order.

How about this instead?

import hashlib
def dict_to_hash(the_dict):
   the_hash = hashlib.md5()
   keys = sorted(the_dict.keys())
   for key in keys:
       value = the_dict[key]
       if isinstance(value, dict):
           value = dict_to_hash(value)
       else:
           value = hash('%s::%s' % (value, type(value)))
       value = "%s::%s" % (key, value)
       the_hash.update(value)
   return the_hash.hexdigest()
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Why do you think it matters that dict.items does not return a predictably ordered list? frozenset takes care of that –  glarrain Jul 11 '14 at 22:54
    
no it doesn't. it gets it in whatever order its given, which is machine specific. –  Steve Yeago Jul 12 '14 at 3:00
1  
A set, by definition, is unordered. Thus the order in which objects are added is irrelevant. You do have to realize that the built-in function hash does not care about how the frozenset contents are printed or something like that. Test it in several machines and python versions and you'll see. –  glarrain Jul 13 '14 at 3:38

Here is a clearer solution.

def freeze(o):
  if isinstance(o,dict):
    return frozenset({ k:freeze(v) for k,v in o.items()}.items())

  if isinstance(o,list):
    return tuple([freeze(v) for v in o])

  return o


def make_hash(o):
    """
    makes a hash out of anything that contains only list,dict and hashable types including string and numeric types
    """
    return hash(freeze(o))  
share|improve this answer

The general approach is fine, but you may want to consider the hashing method.

SHA was designed for cryptographic strength (speed too, but strength is more important). You may want to take this into account. Therefore, using the built-in hash function is probably a good idea, unless security is somehow key here.

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4  
built-in hash function is not designed to store the computed value, and hash result may vary with different versions of python. –  Taha Jahangir Jan 18 '13 at 7:16

I do it like this:

hash(str(my_dict))
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To preserve key order, instead of hash(str(dictionary)) or hash(json.dumps(dictionary)) I would prefer quick-and-dirty solution:

from pprint import pformat
h = hash(pformat(dictionary))

It will work even for types like DateTime and more that are not JSON serializable.

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Who guarantees that pformat or json always use the same order? –  ThiefMaster Jan 30 at 6:02

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