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I want to dynamically open a method and return a value based on the input field. I am trying to ask what I want with an example here. If I could succeed this example, I would do what I want.

Assume I have a class called Greetings which has a method called greet() which takes message as argument.

class Greetings
   def self.greet(message)
      return "good morning" if message=="gm"
      return "evening" if message=="ge"
      return "good afternoon" if message=="ga"
   end
end

When I do a Greetings.greet("ge"), I get "evening" as the output. I want to change this behavior without changing the above Greetings class (obvious reason is that its an external library).

My question here is simple. What should I do when say I call Greetings.greet("ge") should return me "A Very Good Evening" and for all the other inputs, it should return what the original class returns. I know something about dynamically opening a class in Ruby but how would I delegate the method to parent for the other cases?

And I would be writing this inside the config/initializers folder since I am using Rails.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Method aliasing

You can alias your old method as old_greet for example, and redefine with your own:

class Greetings
  class << self
    alias_method :old_greet, :greet

    def greet(message)
      (message == "ge") ? "A Very Good Evening" : old_greet(message)
    end
  end
end

and then you can:

puts Greetings.greet("ge")

Method chaining

With the Rails alias_method_chain feature:

class Greetings
  class << self
    def greet_with_modifications(message)
      (message == "ge") ? "A Very Good Evening" : greet_without_modifications(message)
    end

    alias_method_chain :greet, :modifications
  end
end

and then you can:

puts Greetings.greet("ge")

Extending class

You can create your own class which extends the original like this:

module My
  class Greetings < ::Greetings
    def self.greet(message)
      case message
        when "ge"
          "A Very Good Evening"
        else
          super(message)
      end
    end
  end
end

and then you can:

puts My::Greetings.greet("ge")
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Thanks for such a nice written answer!! –  bragboy May 4 '11 at 18:25
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You could do something like this to reopen the class in your code:

Greetings.class_eval do
  class << self
    alias :old_greet :greet
  end
  def self.greet(message)
    return "a very good evening" if message == "ge"
    old_greet(message)
  end
end
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Can you just reopen the class? is the class_eval needed? –  Matt Greer May 4 '11 at 13:54
    
Funny, we basically posted identical solution, just you used class eval and I directly reopened the class. :-) –  Michael Kohl May 4 '11 at 13:55
3  
With reopening the class, if the class doesn't already exist it will create it. With class_eval, if the class doesn't already exist, an error will be thrown. –  Dylan Markow May 4 '11 at 14:02
    
that's a good point –  Matt Greer May 4 '11 at 14:06
1  
Thank you for letting me know about class_eval –  bragboy May 4 '11 at 17:50
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You could do something like

class Greetings
  class << self
    alias :old_greet :greet
  end

  def self.greet(message)
    return "A very good evening" if message == 'ge'
    old_greet(message)
  end
end
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old_greeting is undefined –  KARASZI István May 4 '11 at 14:11
    
Thanks István, I just wrote the code directly here and obviously confused the class name with the method name. :-) –  Michael Kohl May 4 '11 at 14:15
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What about this, simply?

class Greetings
   def self.greet(message)
      return "good morning" if message=="gm"
      return "evening" if message=="ge"
      return "good afternoon" if message=="ga"
   end
end

class GreetingsOverloaded < Greetings
  def self.greet(message)
      return "A Very Good Evenin" if message=="ge"
      super
   end
end

puts Greetings.greet("ge")
puts GreetingsOverloaded.greet("ge")
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