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I'm having problems.

I have a REST API that uses json_encode to output data as JSON. However, sometimes data gets pushed to the API that is not UTF-8 data. And so when trying to output this data, json_encode throws an exception, because it can only handle UTF-8 data.

What should I do? Can I somehow force every incoming data to be UTF8? This seems to be hard, because I have no information what encoding the data is sent in.

Or should I try to run json_encode on the incoming data and if it can not encode return an error?

EDIT: I forgot to mention that this is a REST API. So I get POST requests to my API with lots of fields and values.

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Where does the data come from? –  Emyr May 4 '11 at 13:54
    
Is the incoming data always either UTF-8 or ISO-8859-1, or are other encodings also in the mix? How international is this? –  Pekka 웃 May 4 '11 at 13:57
    
All different. Some comes from a Twitter StreamingApi Client, some from E-Mail. –  Sebastian Hoitz May 4 '11 at 14:03
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4 Answers

You might want to check out iconv()

iconv — Convert string to requested character encoding

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.iconv.php

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You could use mb_detect_encoding to detect the encoding of the incoming data, then use iconv to translate the data into utf-8.

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+1 Yes, that was the important part I missed. –  Wesley Murch May 4 '11 at 13:58
    
So should I run this on every field in the POST request that is sent to my API? –  Sebastian Hoitz May 4 '11 at 14:04
    
Yes, any data that needs to be converted to UTF-8. If you're sure that all data POSTed in one request will be of the same encoding (i.e. you don't expect a mix of ISO-8859-1 and Chinese characters in the same request), then detect encoding on one field, and use that to convert all of them. Should be easy to write a very basic function to do it for you. –  Craig Sefton May 4 '11 at 14:09
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I prefer mb_string functions. Here is the sample from php.net

/* Convert internal character encoding to SJIS */
$str = mb_convert_encoding($str, "SJIS");

/* Convert EUC-JP to UTF-7 */
$str = mb_convert_encoding($str, "UTF-7", "EUC-JP");

/* Auto detect encoding from JIS, eucjp-win, sjis-win, then convert str to UCS-2LE */
$str = mb_convert_encoding($str, "UCS-2LE", "JIS, eucjp-win, sjis-win");

/* "auto" is expanded to "ASCII,JIS,UTF-8,EUC-JP,SJIS" */
$str = mb_convert_encoding($str, "EUC-JP", "auto");
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You might be able to use mb_detect_encoding() to guess at what character encoding you're getting, but the heuristics involved in guessing a character encoding are less than 100% reliable so it might still not work, and worse you might mangle a string that was valid.

If the JSON source is sending a content-type header, it should also include the (intended) character encoding.

   Content-Type: application/json; charset=ISO-8859-4

If this information is accurate then you could use it to do the transcoding.

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+1 for getting the encoding information from the sender would be the safest practice to rely on –  breiti Nov 13 '11 at 16:48
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