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How can I make, in File.Exist method put some filename that contains some numbers? E.g "file1.abc", "file2.abc", "file3.abc" etc. without using Regex?

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Your question is not clear. File.Exists("file1.abc") is perfectly valid. What are you trying to achieve? –  Daniel Hilgarth May 4 '11 at 13:58
1  
Possible duplicate of C# file exists by file name pattern –  Frédéric Hamidi May 4 '11 at 14:00
    
I try to make universal method like File.Exist(filename + "*.abc") but "*" doesn't work –  Saint May 4 '11 at 14:01
    
@Daniel: I think he means "file?.abc" or file*.abc" –  Marino Šimić May 4 '11 at 14:02
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i think what he means is a file.exist method which can handle wildcards –  AliHA May 4 '11 at 14:03
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you trying to determine if various files match the pattern fileN.abc where N is any number? Because File.Exists can't do this. Use Directory.EnumerateFiles instead to get a list of files that match a specific pattern.

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The EnumerateFiles() method only exists in version 4 of the framework. For earlier versions, Directory.GetFiles() will return the entire list of files which can then be examined for matches. (Though that may get back to the regex concern the OP wished to avoid.) –  ThatBlairGuy May 4 '11 at 14:10
    
I used Directory.GetFiles because I use VS2008 but thank you Matthew for your attention to early name mapping to a specific number. –  Saint May 4 '11 at 14:17
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@ThatBlairGuy: Directory.GetFiles has an overload that accepts a search pattern. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 4 '11 at 14:18
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Do you mean something like

for (int i = 1; i < 4; i++)
{
    string fileName = "file" + i.ToString() + ".abc";
    if (File.Exists(fileName))
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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new DirectoryInfo(dir).EnumerateFiles("file*.abc").Any();

or

Directory.EnumerateFiles(dir, "file*.abc").Any();
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In the unix world, it is called globbing. Maybe you can find a .NET library for that? As a starting point, check out this post: glob pattern matching in .NET

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Below is the code snap which will return all files with name prefix "file" with any digits whose format looks like "fileN.abc", even it wont return with file name "file.abc" or "fileX.abc" etc.

List<string> str = 
    Directory.EnumerateFiles(Server.MapPath("~/"), "file*.abc")
      .Where((file => (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace( 
             Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file).Substring( 
             Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file).IndexOf(
              "file") + "file".Length))) 
            &&  
            (int.TryParse(Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file).Substring( 
                Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file).IndexOf("file") + "file".Length), 
                out result) == true))).ToList();

Hope this would be very helpful, thanks for your time.

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whats a "code snap"? You mean snippet? Also this is a rather hefty expression. What advantages do you see with this compared to the accepted answer? –  vidstige Nov 21 '11 at 18:06
    
Actually, I meant "code snap" to "code block", my given code is executing and working 100%, Also with the accepted answer it allows file.abc file which is not desired( given file format is fileN.abc), but my code doesn't allow file.abc, it only allows fileN.abc where N is a number. –  Elias Hossain Nov 21 '11 at 18:15
    
Hello @vidstige, may I know why you've down voted me though my answer is correct accordingly? –  Elias Hossain Nov 21 '11 at 18:25
    
It's a very late answer to this question and the expression is very long and complicated when there are simpler solutions to this problem. –  vidstige Nov 21 '11 at 18:28
    
@vidstige, I've answered as the accepted answer is wrong! Also, my answer is not complected at all, since filtering condition is a bit longer but works correctly, would you please review your vote. Thanks for your time. –  Elias Hossain Nov 22 '11 at 0:18
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