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in my code I work with Ethernet MAC addresses and need to compare for a 00:00:00:00:00:00 address; the easiest solution I came up with is this:

#define ETH_ADDR_LEN  6
unsigned char mac[ETH_ADDR_LEN] = { 0x1, 0x2, 0x3, 0x4, 0x5, 0x6 };  /* example */
const unsigned char empty[ETH_ADDR_LEN] = { 0, };

if (memcmp(mac, empty, ETH_ADDR_LEN) == 0) {
  ....
}

Is there a more concise way to achieve my goal? Simply memcmp(mac, "", 6) won't work -- may I know why?

Thanks in advance!

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4  
memcmp(mac, "\0\0\0\0\0", 6) "works" :) –  pmg May 4 '11 at 14:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

memcmp(mac, "", 6) does not work because "" is an array of 1 character with zero value (and decays to a pointer to its single element).

Access to elements outside the array invoke Undefined Behaviour.

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There is nothing wrong with your code. Keep it as it is. The "empty" array contains 6 zeroes so it will work just fine.

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The memcmp(mac, "", 6) does not work because the empty string consists of a single NUL character. Comparing 6 bytes will compare your MAC address against that NUL plus 5 bytes of potential garbage following it.

You can, however, force your string to contain six NUL characters using the following. Note that it only needs 5 explicit NULs because the string has an additional trailing NUL:

if(memcmp(mac, "\0\0\0\0\0", 6) == 0) {
  ...
}
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EDIT: Sorry, my web browser is acting up in funny ways. Just ignore my comment. –  Lundin May 4 '11 at 14:43
    
No problem, thanks. I have edited my answer to better reflect your clarifications. Thanks! –  Scott Moonen May 4 '11 at 14:45
    
Thanks everybody for feedback. I don't completely understand when Scott said that "You can, however, force your string to contain six NUL characters using the following. Note that it only needs 5 explicit NULs because the string has an additional trailing NUL". –  Mark May 4 '11 at 15:08
    
Hi @Mark. This is true of any string literal in C. If I were to type this: strcmp(s1, "abc", 3), then the memory storage for the string "abc" actually has a NUL character following it. In this case, we have the string literal "\0\0\0\0\0", which has 5 explicit NUL characters. But in storage the compiler will have added an additional terminating NUL character just like it did for the string literal "abc". –  Scott Moonen May 4 '11 at 15:12
    
Thank you, it is clear now. –  Mark May 4 '11 at 16:00

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