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With the maven2eclipse plugin the problem is zero documentation. It give me one choice when I right click the project within eclipse 'Enable dependency management' I tried it but gave me a rather sparse POM.xml in addition to the following console output:

04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Generating sources /BenCode/pom.xml
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Build error for /BenCode/pom.xml; org.apache.maven.plugin.PluginResolutionException: Plugin org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-resources-plugin:2.4.3 or one of its dependencies could not be resolved: Failed to read artifact descriptor for org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-resources-plugin:jar:2.4.3
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler source setting, assuming default
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler target setting, assuming default
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler source setting, assuming default
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler target setting, assuming default
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler test inclusions, assuming defaults
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler test exclusions, assuming defaults
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler inclusions, assuming defaults
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Failed to determine compiler exclusions, assuming defaults
04/05/11 14:57:54 BST: Refreshing [/BenCode/pom.xml] 

Having not used Maven before trying to work out what to do is rather a puzzle. My impression was that maven should scan class path dependencies using that info to manage the project but no such luck :(

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Maven will only manage dependencies specified in the POM (and any transitive dependencies (ie. the dependencies of the dependencies you directly define). Eg. below will add JUnit as dependency in the scope of test

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>junit</groupId>
        <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
        <version>4.8.2</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <!-- ... -->
</dependencies>

If you right click on the pom.xml you can select Maven -> Add dependency - which will search the default repositories.

Also read Introduction to the Dependency Mechanism

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The documentation is there...but you must read it.

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Firstly I should say that while I do use the m2eclipse plugin for Eclipse, I only actually use the "enable dependency management" feature; everything else I write by hand, in the pom.xml text editor. This is just a personal preference, rather than a rule.

The thing to remember about maven is that it works on the basis of "convention over configuration" - which basically means that unless you specifically tell it otherwise there are a lot of assumptions that it makes.

The first assumption is that your directory structure matches the following:

Project Dir
    |
    |- src
    |    |- main
    |    |    |- java
    |    |    |- resources
    |    |
    |    |- test
    |    |    |- java
    |    |    |- resources
    |    |
    |    |- site
    |
    |- pom.xml

(More details on the directory structure can be found at Introduction to the Standard Directory Layout)

If your project doesn't match this structure, then you need to let Maven know, eg:

  <build>
    <directory>target</directory>
    <outputDirectory>target/classes</outputDirectory>
    <testOutputDirectory>target/test-classes</testOutputDirectory>
    <sourceDirectory>src/main/java</sourceDirectory>
    <scriptSourceDirectory>src/main/scripts</scriptSourceDirectory>
    <testSourceDirectory>src/test/java</testSourceDirectory>
    <resources>
      <resource>
        <directory>src/main/resources</directory>
      </resource>
    </resources>
    <testResources>
      <testResource>
        <directory>src/test/resources</directory>
      </testResource>
    </testResources>
  </build>

The next part to worry about is the dependencies... This is where Maven is quite strong, but only if you actually know where your dependencies are, and it can be quite confusing for someone just starting out with Maven (it frustrated the hell out of me!). Here's a couple of dependencies added (JUnit - only used in the test phase - and log4j)

  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
      <version>4.8.2</version>
      <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>log4j</groupId>
      <artifactId>log4j</artifactId>
      <version>1.2.16</version>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>

Maven should be smart enough to determine the dependencies of the specified dependencies, etc, so you should only need to reference the dependencies you are directly using.

If the dependencies you require cannot be found in the repository that Maven uses, you will need to add further repositories - Google is your friend in this case.

That should probably sort out your initial problems.

Depending on the size of your development team, you may find it worthwhile to set up a local repository manager and have Maven use the local repo as the source of all dependencies, and it would download any not stored within, but that's another can of worms, for when you're more familiar with Maven itself.

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