Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

and thanks for any assistance.

How would I return from a method an unknown Generic.List type.

public void Main()
{
  List<A> a= GetData("A");   
}

public List<T> GetData(string listType)
{
   if(listType == "A")
   {
     List<A> a= new List<A>() 
     ...
     return a; 
   }
   else
   {
     List<B> b = new List<B>()
     return b;

   }
}

In the below example I recieve an error similar to: Can't Convert List<A> to List<T>

Is this possible? The error occurs on the 'return a;' line of code.
Also, What will I need to do to make sure an error does not occur on the line:

List<A> a= GetData("A");

Thanks, Steven

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use IList instead of List<T>.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed that should be the eventual goal, but it doesn't really help him solve the immediate problem. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 26 '09 at 0:24

You can't directly return a List<T> like this.

Why? Basically because List<A> and List<B> (or List<string> vs List<int> which is the same thing) are considered as 2 totally seperate unrelated classes.
Just as you can't return a string from a function which is declared to return int, you can't return a List of strings from a function which is declared to return a list of ints. The <T> here is a bit of a red herring. You couldn't write a generic method which returned both strings and ints either...

See here for more info on that kind of thing.

So what you have to do is return something that both types derive from (what they "have in common".)
As John Rasch says, you could return IList, (note the NON generic, so it's just a list of objects) or simply return it as an object. Unfortunately there is no way to preserve the type of the list.

share|improve this answer

An alternative to being limited to returning a list of objects would be to either ensure that A and B derive from a common base type or implement a common interface, then return a list of that base type or interface. Include a constraint on the Generic method to that effect:-

List<ICommon> GetData<T>() where T: ICommon
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
nifty, didn't know about the constraint 'where T: ICommon' +1 –  Jon Erickson Feb 26 '09 at 0:47

Unless there's a specific reason that you can't specify the actual type ahead of time, you can just make the method itself generic:

public void Main() {
    List<A> a = GetData<A>();
}

public List<TType> GetData<TType>() {
     List<TType> list= new List<TType>();
     ...
     return list; 
}
share|improve this answer

EDIT per Orion's answer below, added contraint that AnthonyWJones suggested

you probably should have an interface/abstract class that A and B are inheriting from

    public interface IMyInterface { }
    public class A : IMyInterface { }
    public class B : IMyInterface { }

    public List<IMyInterface> GetData<T>() where T : IMyInterface
    {
        List<IMyInterface> myList = new List<IMyInterface>();
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(A))
        {
            myList.Add(new A());
        }
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(B))
        {
            myList.Add(new B());
        }
        return myList;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot the type parameter- added it in for you. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 26 '09 at 0:29
    
if( typeof(T) == typeof(A) ) makes sad panda :-( –  Orion Edwards Feb 26 '09 at 0:29
    
@Orion How could I make that better? i agree it looks ugly, but my idea was accomplished. –  Jon Erickson Feb 26 '09 at 0:34

I had to solve a similar problem recently where none of the proposed solutions was satisfactory; constraining the type parameter was not practical. Instead, I let the consumers of the method decide how to munge the data. For example, you can write a generic version of String.Split() that returns a strongly typed List, so long as you tell it how to convert substrings into T's.

Once you are willing to shift responsibility up the call stack (and get comfortable passing lambdas around), you can generalize this pattern arbitrarily. For instance, if the way you GetData() varies (as some responses apparently assume), you can hoist that function into the caller's scope as well.

Demo:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var parseMe = "Hello world!  1, 2, 3, DEADBEEF";

    // Don't need to write a fully generic Process() method just to parse strings -- you could 
    // combine the Split & Convert into one method and eliminate 2/3 of the type parameters
    List<string> sentences = parseMe.Split('!', str => str);
    List<int> numbers = sentences[1].Split(',', str => Int32.Parse(str, NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier | NumberStyles.AllowLeadingWhite));

    // Something a little more interesting
    var lettersPerSentence = Process(sentences,
                                     sList => from s in sList select s.ToCharArray(),
                                     chars => chars.Count(c => Char.IsLetter(c)));
}

static List<T> Split<T>(this string str, char separator, Func<string, T> Convert)
{       
    return Process(str, s => s.Split(separator), Convert).ToList();
}

static IEnumerable<TOutput> Process<TInput, TData, TOutput>(TInput input, Func<TInput, IEnumerable<TData>> GetData, Func<TData, TOutput> Convert)
{
    return from datum in GetData(input)
           select Convert(datum);
}

Functional programming gurus will probably yawn at this exploration: "you're just composing Map a few times." Even C++ guys might claim it's an example where template techniques (i.e. STL transform() + functors) require less work than generics. But as someone who primarily does C# it was nice to find a solution that preserved both type safety and idiomatic language usage.

share|improve this answer

If you don't know the type you want until run-time, then generics are probably the wrong tool for the job.

If your function significantly changes behavior (like changing return type) based on an argument, then it should probably be two functions.

It looks like this function should not be generic, and should actually be two functions.

public void Main() {
    List<A> a = GetDataA();
}

public List<A> GetDataA() {
     List<A> a= new List<A>() 
     ...
     return a; 
}
public List<B> GetDataB() {
     List<B> b= new List<B>() 
     ...
     return b; 
}
share|improve this answer

I know its way too late but I came here with the same issue and this is how i worked it out using interfaces. Thought I'll post it for the benefit of others

 public interface IEntity
    {
        int ID
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }

public class Entity2:IEntity
    {
        public string Property2;

        public int ID
        {
            get
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
            set
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }
    }

Similarly for Entity1.

Now in my class (my business layer) I have this method

 public List<IEntity> GetEntities(Common.EntityType entityType)
           {
               List<IEntity> entities = new List<IEntity>();

               switch (entityType)
               {
                   case Common.EntityType.Accounts:
                       Entity1 entity1 = new Entity1();
                       entity1.Property1 = "AA";
                       entities.Add(entity1);

                       break;
                   case Common.EntityType.Brands:
                       Entity2 entity2 = new Entity2();
                       entity2.Property2 = "AA";
                       entities.Add(entity2);

                       break;
                   default:
                       break;
               }

 return entities;
       }

From the UI, I would call it like this

BusinessClass b = new BusinessClass();
        List<IEntity> a = b.GetEntities(Common.EntityType.Accounts);

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.