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I'm trying to develop 2 classes, Node and Connection, but I don't have experience in C++ or C++ templates.

The Node contains a list of connections and a Connection contains 2 nodes. So I suppose that a node has a template parameter that specifies which type of connections are in the list and that a connection has a template parameter that specifies which kind of nodes it contains.

How can I enforce in C++ that the node contains connections of a generic type but that these connections contain nodes of the class Node? The same question for the Connection class. I want to have a generic parameter for the type of the nodes, but these generic nodes must contain a list with connections of the Connection class.

I've tried several things, this is what I have at the moment:

template <template <template <class Conn> class Node> class Conn>
class Node {
};

Can someone help me?

Thanks in advance,

Jef

share|improve this question
3  
Why use templates? –  Etienne de Martel May 4 '11 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that you want different types of Nodes, but that Connections are nothing but a link between two Nodes (that is, that you don't need to do any specialisation on the Connections) then you could do something like:

template <class Node>
class Connection
{
    Node& node1;
    Node& node2;
};

template <class Node>
class NodeBase
{
    std::list< Connection<Node> > connections;
};

// example concrete node
class MassNode : public NodeBase<MassNode>
{
    // stuff that makes a mass node more than just a node.
}

This is a pattern called the curiously recurring template pattern.

There are other ways of attacking this - can you give more info on your specific problem domain?

EDIT to show intrusive vs non-intrusive techniques

namespace intrusive
{
    template <class node>
    class directedConnection
    {
        node& From;
        node& To;
    };

    template <class node>
    class directedGraphNode
    {
    private:
        std::set< directedConnection<node>* > OutgoingConnections;
        std::set< directedConnection<node>* > IncomingConnections;
    };

    // sample concrete class. Note that it is a graph node AND it contains the node data.
    class bayesianNetworkNode : public directedGraphNode<bayesianNetworkNode>
    {
    public:
        double Probabilities[16];
    };

    bayesianNetworkNode B1, B2, B3;
}

namespace non_intrusive
{
    template <class T>
    class undirectedGraphNode;

    template <class T>
    class undirectedConnection
    {
        undirectedGraphNode<typename T>& Node1;
        undirectedGraphNode<typename T>& Node2;
    };

    template <class T>
    class undirectedGraphNode
    {
    private:
        std::set< undirectedConnection<T>* > Connections;
        T Value;
    public:
        T& operator * () { return Value; }
        T* operator -> () { return &Value; }
    };

    // sample concrete class. Note that this class contains the node data, but is NOT actually a graph node itself.
    // It is "pointed to" by a node in the same way that an STL iterator "points to" a collection item.
    class markovNetworkNode
    {
    public:
        std::set<formula> Formulae;
    };

    undirectedGraphNode<markovNetworkNode> M1, M2, M3;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I want to model Bayesian and Markov networks. So a concrete node can be a random variable for example and a connection can be either directed or undirected. So I also need specialisations on the Connection class... How can I fix this? –  hermi May 4 '11 at 15:53
    
On my way out - will get back later with two techniques - one intrusive (as the above code is), the other not. –  Gavin Lock May 4 '11 at 17:06
    
+1 Nice answer. Clean, simple and does the job. Also completely generic. –  ralphtheninja May 4 '11 at 20:07
    
Have edited to show directed and undirected network examples. And to show the difference between intrusive (each node contains its business-level data as well as participating within the graph) and non-intrusive (the class written to store each node's business data knows nothing about that fact that is contained in a graph.). The latter technique is used by many generic containers, particularly the STL. –  Gavin Lock May 5 '11 at 12:54

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