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In C, I'm using printf("%+10.5d\n", x); to print the integer x.

I've written a small test case for C++ io manipulators, but the output has a different format:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cstdio>

int main(void)
{
        int x = 3;
        printf("%+10.5d\n", x);
        std::cout << std::showpos << std::setw(10) << std::setprecision(5) << x << std::endl;
        return 0;
}

The output is:

./testcommand
       +00003
           +3

Which io manipulator I am missing here to get the same output as with printf?

share|improve this question
    
Or, you could avoid <iomanip> altogether and use Boost.Format. –  Robᵩ May 4 '11 at 16:03

4 Answers 4

std::setfill
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/manipulators/setfill/

with a short if statement
((x>0) ? "+" : "" )

so:
std::cout << ((x>0) ? "+" : "" ) << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(10) << std::setprecision(5) << x << std::endl;

share|improve this answer
    
Ups, my fault. c&p truncates the ' ' characters in the output. setfill fills all 10 charaters, not only 5. –  cytrinox May 4 '11 at 15:46
    
setfill() won't do the job. It would fill the spaces on the left of + instead. –  Saurabh Manchanda May 4 '11 at 15:47
1  
Your solution would print 00000000+3 which is wrong. –  cytrinox May 4 '11 at 15:49
    
@cytrinox you were right please find the above answer corrected. Also note I would argue that since you are dealing with a whole different type of manipulator (the <iomanip> library instead of format strings) you are not going to get the same exact behavior. –  Jordan May 4 '11 at 15:56

Using boost::format you can get what you're looking for in a more terse format.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/release/libs/format/doc/format.html

#include <boost/format.hpp>

int main(void)
{
    int x = 3;
    std::cout << boost::format("%+10.5d") % x << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

For sprintf functionality you could change the cout line to this.

std::string x_string = boost::str(boost::format("%+10.5d") % x);
share|improve this answer

The closest I can get is this (note the std::internal):

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cstdio>

int main(void)
{
    int x = 3;
    printf("%+10.5d\n", x);
    std::cout << std::setfill('0') << std::internal << std::showpos << std::setw(10) << std::setprecision(5) << x << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

which is still not quite right:

    +00003
+000000003

but it's an improvement.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, as you say, it's not quite right :) –  cytrinox May 4 '11 at 15:52
    
@cytrinox: well at least it might help to steer you in the right direction. ;-) –  Paul R May 4 '11 at 15:55

In this particular case, I don't think it's possible, at least not without a lot of work. In C++ (unlike in C), the precision argument is ignored when outputting an integer, so you can't obtain the effect you want using just manipulators (and boost::format doesn't support it either). You'll probably have to format to a string, then prefix or insert the '0' manually.

In the past, I had a GB_Format class (this was pre-namespace days), a bit like boost::format, but which did support all of the Posix formatting specifications; in order to make "%.<i>n</i>d" work, I had to implement the integral conversions myself, rather than using the underlying stream conversions. Something like the following:

std::string
fmtInt( int value, int width, int precision )
{
    unsigned            work = (value < 0 ? -value : value);
    std::string         result;
    while ( work != 0 || result.size() < precision ) {
        result += "0123456789"[ work % 10 ];
        work /= 10;
    }
    result += (value < 0 ? '-' : '+');
    while ( result.size() < width ) {
        result += ' ';
    }
    return std::string( result.rbegin(), result.rend() );
}
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