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I've developed a nice rich application interface using Backbone.js where users can add objects very quickly, and then start updating properties of those objects by simply tabbing to the relevant fields. The problem I am having is that sometimes the user beats the server to its initial save and we end up saving two objects.

An example of how to recreate this problem is as follows:

  1. User clicks the Add person button, we add this to the DOM but don't save anything yet as we don't have any data yet.

    person = new Person();

  2. User enters a value into the Name field, and tabs out of it (name field loses focus). This triggers a save so that we update the model on the server. As the model is new, Backbone.js will automatically issue a POST (create) request to the server.

    person.set ({ name: 'John' });

    person.save(); // create new model

  3. User then very quickly types into the age field they have tabbed into, enters 20 and tabs to the next field (age therefore loses focus). This again triggers a save so that we update the model on the server.

    person.set ({ age: 20 });

    person.save(); // update the model

So we would expect in this scenario one POST request to create the model, and one PUT requests to update the model.

However, if the first request is still being processed and we have not had a response before the code in point 3 above has run, then what we actually get is two POST requests and thus two objects created instead of one.

So my question is whether there is some best practice way of dealing with this problem and Backbone.js? Or, should Backbone.js have a queuing system for save actions so that one request is not sent until the previous request on that object has succeeded/failed? Or, alternatively should I build something to handle this gracefully by either sending only one create request instead of multiple update requests, perhaps use throttling of some sort, or check if the Backbone model is in the middle of a request and wait until that request is completed.

Your advice on how to deal with this issue would be appreciated.

And I'm happy to take a stab at implementing some sort of queuing system, although you may need to put up with my code which just won't be as well formed as the existing code base!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I have tested and devised a patch solution, inspired by both @Paul and @Julien who posted in this thread. Here is the code:

(function() {
  function proxyAjaxEvent(event, options, dit) {
    var eventCallback = options[event];
    options[event] = function() {
      // check if callback for event exists and if so pass on request
      if (eventCallback) { eventCallback(arguments) }
      dit.processQueue(); // move onto next save request in the queue
    }
  }
  Backbone.Model.prototype._save = Backbone.Model.prototype.save;
  Backbone.Model.prototype.save = function( attrs, options ) {
    if (!options) { options = {}; }
    if (this.saving) {
      this.saveQueue = this.saveQueue || new Array();
      this.saveQueue.push({ attrs: _.extend({}, this.attributes, attrs), options: options });
    } else {
      this.saving = true;
      proxyAjaxEvent('success', options, this);
      proxyAjaxEvent('error', options, this);
      Backbone.Model.prototype._save.call( this, attrs, options );
    }
  }
  Backbone.Model.prototype.processQueue = function() {
    if (this.saveQueue && this.saveQueue.length) {
      var saveArgs = this.saveQueue.shift();
      proxyAjaxEvent('success', saveArgs.options, this);
      proxyAjaxEvent('error', saveArgs.options, this);
      Backbone.Model.prototype._save.call( this, saveArgs.attrs, saveArgs.options );
    } else {
      this.saving = false;
    }
  }
})();

The reason this works is as follows:

  1. When an update or create request method on a model is still being executed, the next request is simply put in a queue to be processed when one of the callbacks for error or success are called.

  2. The attributes at the time of the request are stored in an attribute array and passed to the next save request. This therefore means that when the server responds with an updated model for the first request, the updated attributes from the queued request are not lost.

I have uploaded a Gist which can be forked here.

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A much simpler solution exists using jQuery Deferred Objects: stackoverflow.com/questions/10000352/ajax-queue-backbone-js –  jasop Aug 21 '13 at 15:40

A light-weight solution would be to monkey-patch Backbone.Model.save, so you'll only try to create the model once; any further saves should be deferred until the model has an id. Something like this should work?

Backbone.Model.prototype._save = Backbone.Model.prototype.save;
Backbone.Model.prototype.save = function( attrs, options ) {
    if ( this.isNew() && this.request ) {
        var dit = this, args = arguments;
        $.when( this.request ).always( function() {
            Backbone.Model.prototype._save.apply( dit, args );
        } );
    }
    else {
        this.request = Backbone.Model.prototype._save.apply( this, arguments );
    }
};
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This looks like a brilliant concise solution. I'll be implementing this next week in development and will revert with my feedback then. Great solution though. –  Matthew O'Riordan Jun 21 '11 at 12:06
    
Unfortunately this did not work for a few reasons: this.requests always returns true and does not trigger a chained event so always fires immediately, it is not deferred. Also, the attributes of the model are updated when the server responds, so any attributes written directly using model.set() are lost in subsequent requests. I will post a working solution below. –  Matthew O'Riordan Jun 21 '11 at 14:31
    
Did you try this on a HEAD version of Backbone? I forgot to mention it, but that should return the actual XHR request object on save (instead of the model, in older Backbone versions); it shouldn't return 'true' at least? –  Paul Jun 28 '11 at 15:21
    
This is the most elegant solution. It should be included as a pull request in Backbone master. –  zzawaideh Sep 28 '12 at 23:29
    
This should be tweaked: save() should (according to the Backbone docs) return the jqXHR object upon success - so you should add return this.request at least in the else case. –  philfreo Oct 11 '12 at 0:56

I have some code I call EventedModel:

EventedModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
save: function(attrs, options) {
  var complete, self, success, value;
  self = this;
  options || (options = {});
  success = options.success;
  options.success = function(resp) {
    self.trigger("save:success", self);
    if (success) {
      return success(self, resp);
    }
  };
  complete = options.complete;
  options.complete = function(resp) {
    self.trigger("save:complete", self);
    if (complete) {
      return complete(self, resp);
    }
  };
  this.trigger("save", this);
  value = Backbone.Model.prototype.save.call(this, attrs, options);
  return value;
}
});

You can use it as a backbone model. But it will trigger save and save:complete. You can boost this a little:

EventedSynchroneModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
save: function(attrs, options) {
  var complete, self, success, value;
  if(this.saving){
    if(this.needsUpdate){
      this.needsUpdate = {
         attrs: _.extend(this.needsUpdate, attrs),
         options: _.extend(this.needsUpdate, options)};
    }else {
      this.needsUpdate = { attrs: attrs, options: options };
    }
    return;
  }
  self = this;
  options || (options = {});
  success = options.success;
  options.success = function(resp) {
    self.trigger("save:success", self);
    if (success) {
      return success(self, resp);
    }
  };
  complete = options.complete;
  options.complete = function(resp) {
    self.trigger("save:complete", self);
    //call previous callback if any
    if (complete) {
      complete(self, resp);
    }
    this.saving = false;
    if(self.needsUpdate){
      self.save(self.needsUpdate.attrs, self.needsUpdate.options);
      self.needsUpdate = null;
    }
  };
  this.trigger("save", this);
  // we are saving
  this.saving = true;
  value = Backbone.Model.prototype.save.call(this, attrs, options);
  return value;
}
});

(untested code)

Upon the first save call it will save the record normally. If you quickly do a new save it will buffer that call (merging the different attributes and options into a single call). Once the first save succeed, you go forward with the second save.

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Fantastic answer @Julien, but got a few questions. As formatting of comments in Stackoverflow is crap, excuse the fact that I have added numerous comments for each question below: –  Matthew O'Riordan May 6 '11 at 9:06
    
Question 1: Shouldn't the code if (complete) { return success(self, resp); } read if (complete) { return complete(self, resp); } –  Matthew O'Riordan May 6 '11 at 9:07
    
Question 2: If an option callback for complete is passed to the original save function, then surely the update will never get called as you are calling return before you execute the needsUpdate code? –  Matthew O'Riordan May 6 '11 at 9:09
    
Point 3: I'll work on integrating this code in the next few days and post up a Gist of the code anyway.... So I'll come back with tested code soon. –  Matthew O'Riordan May 6 '11 at 9:10
    
For question #1. Yes it shouldn't return at this point. if (complete) { complete(self, resp); } –  Julien May 6 '11 at 15:17

As an alternative to the above answer, you could achieve the same affect by overloading the backbone.sync method to be synchronous for this model. Doing so would force each call to wait for the previous to finish.

Another option would be to just do the sets when the user is filing things out and do one save at the end. That well also reduce the amount of requests the app makes as well

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Making Backbone.sync synchronous would slow the user's experience of the application down significantly. The application is similar to Google Docs so needs to feel like a desktop application and persist in the background. Unfortunately saving at the end is not a great option for me as I am concerned I will lose some updates. The app is similar to a spreadsheet, once a user has left that cell, I think we need to update the model (which is effectively the row). –  Matthew O'Riordan May 6 '11 at 8:54
    
I'm not saying to make the entire application synchronous, only override the sync for this model. Even with a queuing system, if you have 7 or 8 saves queued up and the user navigates away from the screen those saves get lost. In that case, you'll still have to lock the user on the screen somehow until the saves are finished. The queuing system fixes your race condition, but also presents that issue. Why build your own queue system when sending the ajax request as sync instead of async achieves the same result? –  ryanmarc May 6 '11 at 15:03

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