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I'm new to c# and have been puzzling over this for a couple of days. Basically I want to create a type of property with getter and setter logic delegated to a base type to which this parameter belongs.

This is just one application: a property whose value is set by, say, the registry or some config file.

  • The property handler on a get would do something like check a cached value (or not), retrieve the value if not cached, cache the value (or not) and return it.
  • Behavior for the setter would allow only the property handler to set the value (if possible).

Any suggestions? I've thought about using DefaultPropertyAttribute, but I can't quite see how not to write all the logic necessary with each accessor.


Looks like this is what I want: http://www.sharpcrafters.com/postsharp

"Write less code" Yup. That's it alright.

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2 Answers 2

I'm not proud of it:

public abstract class HorribleBaseType
{
  private Lazy<string> _connectionString;
  private Action<string> _connectionStringSetter;
  private Func<string> _connectionStringGetter;

  public HorribleBaseType(
    Func<string> connectionStringGetter, 
    Action<string> connectionStringSetter)
  {
    _connectionStringGetter = connectionStringGetter;
    _connectionStringSetter = connectionStringSetter;

    _connectionString = new Lazy<string>(connectionStringGetter);
  }

  public string ConnectionString
  {
    get { return _connectionString.Value; }
    set 
    { 
      _connectionStringSetter(value);
      _connectionString = new Lazy<string>(_connectionStringGetter);
    }
  }
}

public class HorribleType : HorribleBaseType
{
  public HorribleType()
    : base(() => MyConfiguration.ConnectionString,
           (v) => MyConfiguration.ConnectionString = v) { }
}

100% untested.

UPDATE Using a combination of the above, and @hunter's answer, you could do something like:

public class DelegateProperty<T>
{
    #region Fields
    private readonly Func<T> _getter;
    private readonly Action<T> _setter;
    private Lazy<T> _lazy;
    #endregion

    #region Constructors
    public DelegateProperty(Func<T> getter, Action<T> setter)
    {
        _getter = getter;
        _setter = setter;

        _lazy = new Lazy<T>(getter);
    }
    #endregion

    #region Properties
    public T Value
    {
        get { return _lazy.Value; }
        set
        {
            _setter(value);
            _lazy = new Lazy<T>(_getter);
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Operators
    public static implicit operator T(DelegateProperty<T> prop)
    {
        return prop.Value; 
    }
    #endregion
}

With that, you can now do something like:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string name = "Matt";
        var prop = new DelegateProperty<string>(
            () => name,
            value => name = value);

        var test = new Test(prop);
        Console.WriteLine(test.Name);

        test.Name = "Ben";
        Console.WriteLine(name);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class Test
{
    private readonly DelegateProperty<string> NameProperty;

    public Test(DelegateProperty<string> prop)
    {
        NameProperty = prop;   
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return NameProperty; }
        set { NameProperty.Value = value; }
    }
}
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+1 because you didn't test it –  hunter May 4 '11 at 17:42

Using this stupid class:

public class Property<T>
{
    Func<T> _func;
    T _value;
    bool _fetched;

    public Property(Func<T> func)
    {
        _func = func;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get 
        {
            if (!_fetched)
            {
                _value = _func();
                _fetched = true;
            }
            return _value;
        }
        set { _value = value; }
    }
}

you can do something like this:

public class TestClass
{
    Property<int> _propertyInt;
    public int MyInt
    {
        get { return _propertyInt.Value; }
        set { _propertyInt.Value = value; }
    }

    Property<string> _propertyString;
    public string MyString
    {
        get { return _propertyString.Value; }
        set { _propertyString.Value = value; }
    }
}

Of course this won't handle every case but it might get you on the "right" track...

share|improve this answer
    
But you would still have a general-purpose setter, not constrained to the expected behavior type. At least you get that the idea is not to take up the base class with this behavior. I'm not totally against the idea on general setters, though coming from a scripting background. –  Axeman May 4 '11 at 18:04

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