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Say I have the following XML:

<root>
   <tokens>
      <token ID="t1">blah</token>
      <token ID="t2">blabla</token>
      <token ID="t3">shovel</token>
   </tokens>

   <relatedStuff>
      <group gID="s1">
        <references tokID="t1"/>
        <references tokID="t2"/>
      </group>

      <group gID="s2">
        <references tokID="t3"/>
      </group>

   </relatedStuff>
</root>

Now, considering that a for-each loop for every token would be pretty inefficient and a bad idea, how would one go about using template matching, to transform this xml into the following?

<s id="everything_merged"> 
    <tok id="t1" gID="s1" >blah</tok> 
    <tok id="t2" gID="s1" >blabla</tok> 

    <tok id="t3" gID="s2" >shovel</tok>
</s> 

All I want from <s> is the "gID", the gID corresponding to the token in the <tokens>.

<xsl:for-each select="b:root/a:tokens/a:token">
    <!-- and here some template matching -->
    <xsl:attribute name="gID">
         <xsl:value-of select="--correspondingNode's--@gID"/>
    </xsl:attribute>

</xsl:for-each>

I'm pretty fuzzy on this sort of thing, so thank you very much for any help!

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my solution for a complete and short, pure "push-style" solution that also uses keys. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 5 '11 at 4:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following stylesheet:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <s id="everything_merged">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="/root/tokens/token" />
        </s>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="token">
        <tok id="{@ID}" gID="{/root/relatedStuff/group[
                                references[@tokID=current()/@ID]]/@gID}">
            <xsl:apply-templates />
        </tok>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Applied to this input (corrected for well-formedness):

<root>
    <tokens>
        <token ID="t1">blah</token>
        <token ID="t2">blabla</token>
        <token ID="t3">shovel</token>
    </tokens>
    <relatedStuff>
        <group gID="s1">
            <references tokID="t1" />
            <references tokID="t2" />
        </group>
        <group gID="s2">
            <references tokID="t3" />
        </group>
    </relatedStuff>
</root>

Produces:

<s id="everything_merged">
    <tok id="t1" gID="s1">blah</tok>
    <tok id="t2" gID="s1">blabla</tok>
    <tok id="t3" gID="s2">shovel</tok>
</s>
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant. I had no idea you could do this [] nesting group[references[@tokID=current()/@ID]]! Thanks a bunch! –  Twodordan May 5 '11 at 12:09

A solution using keys and pure "push-style:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kgIDfromTokId" match="@gID"
  use="../*/@tokID"/>

 <xsl:template match="tokens">
  <s id="everything_merged">
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </s>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="token">
  <tok id="{@ID}" gID="{key('kgIDfromTokId', @ID)}">
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </tok>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
    <tokens>
        <token ID="t1">blah</token>
        <token ID="t2">blabla</token>
        <token ID="t3">shovel</token>
    </tokens>
    <relatedStuff>
        <group gID="s1">
            <references tokID="t1" />
            <references tokID="t2" />
        </group>
        <group gID="s2">
            <references tokID="t3" />
        </group>
    </relatedStuff>
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<s id="everything_merged">
   <tok id="t1" gID="s1">blah</tok>
   <tok id="t2" gID="s1">blabla</tok>
   <tok id="t3" gID="s2">shovel</tok>
</s>
share|improve this answer
    
Very useful answer, thanks. The more you know! This will come in useful, and it seems to be more elegant. Is there any performance difference between your approach and Lwburk's? (I should read up on keys and "push-style") –  Twodordan May 5 '11 at 12:18
    
@Twodordan: Once the first key() function is executed the index is built and every next execution of the function comes almost for free. So, using keys is usually significantly more efficient when the key() function needs to be called at least twice. In this case it is called only once, and I have used it just for convenience. This solution could still be more efficient -- depends on the specific XSLT processor and one needs to perform measurements to find the exact performance difference and whether it is significant. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 5 '11 at 12:23

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