Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a set of points (x,y,z). I want to sort these data using first column and 2nd and 3rd columns should be rearranged according to the sorting 1st column. is it possible to do this in c++, if so could you pls help me.

Herewith I am attaching codes of my implementation but I got a error message “invalid conversion from ‘const’ vod*’ to ‘const int [*][3]’ “ in line 31 and 32. I tried this using several methods but my effort was not success yet. I used here ‘qsort’ for this, are there any other methods or can I use ‘sort’ in to do this. Since I have a very big data set I wish to use a fast method. So what I need at the end the data set which is sorted using only 1st column like following example: before sort

34  12  12
12  34 15
24  20  34
13  11  10
40  23  32

after sort

12  34 15
13  11  10
24  20  34
34  12  12
40  23  32

if any good methods help me to write codes …thanks

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <vector>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

class Point
{
   private:          
    double x;
    double y;
    double z;

   public:
     Point(){};
     ~Point(){};

   Point(double X, double Y, double Z){
     x=X;y=Y;z=Z; }

   double X(){return x;}
   double Y(){return y;}
   double Z(){return z;}
};

int cmp ( const void *pa, const void *pb ) {
const int (*a)[3] = pa;
const int (*b)[3] = pb;
if ( (*a)[1] < (*b)[1] ) return -1;
if ( (*a)[1] > (*b)[1] ) return +1;
return 0;
}

int main ( ) {
vector<Point> points;
int input_x,input_y,input_z;       
   int i=0;
   while(i<6){//data set,it is a example, actual data come from a file 

         cout<<"x: ";cin>>input_x;
         cout<<"y: ";cin>>input_y;
         cout<<"z: ";cin>>input_z;
         Point point(input_x,input_y,input_z);                        
         points.push_back(point);
        i++;                         
         }        
for (int i=0;i<points.size();i++){//before sort
cout<<points[i].X()<<" "<<points[i].Y()<<" "<<points[i].Z()<<endl;
}

qsort( points, 6, sizeof points[0], cmp );

for (int i=0;i<points.size();i++){//after sort
cout<<points[i].X()<<" "<<points[i].Y()<<" "<<points[i].Z()<<endl;
}            
system("PAUSE");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's almost certainly easiest to use std::sort instead of qsort:

class Point { 
    int x, y, z;
public:
    Point(int x, int y, int z) : x(x), y(y), z(z) {}

    bool operator<(Point const &other) { 
        return x < other.x;
    }
    // skipping the reading and other stuff for now...
};

int main() { 
    std::vector<Point> points;
    // add some Points to `points` here.

    // sort using order defined in Point::operator<:
    std::sort(points.begin(), points.end());
    return 0;
}

Edit: to keep the comparison separate from the items being compared, you use a separate function or functor to do the comparison, and pass that to std::sort. There are a few things about your class that you really want to change in any case though -- at the very least, since your Point::X(), Point::Y() and Point::Z() don't modify the Point object, you want to make them const member functions. Once you've done that, the sorting is fairly trivial:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

class Point { 
    double x, y, z;
public:
    double X() const { return x; }
    double Y() const { return y; }
    double Z() const { return z; }

    Point(double x=0.0, double y=0.0, double z=0.0) : x(x), y(y), z(z) {}
};

namespace std { 
ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, Point const &p) { 
    return os << "(" << p.X() << ", " << p.Y() << ", " << p.Z() << ")";
}
}
struct byX { 
    bool operator()(Point const &a, Point const &b) { 
        return a.X() < b.X();
    }
};

int main(){ 
    std::vector<Point> points;

    for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
        points.push_back(Point(rand(), i, i));

    std::cout << "Unsorted:\n";
    std::copy(points.begin(), points.end(), 
        std::ostream_iterator<Point>(std::cout, "\n"));

    std::sort(points.begin(), points.end(), byX());

    std::cout << "\nSorted:\n";
    std::copy(points.begin(), points.end(), 
        std::ostream_iterator<Point>(std::cout, "\n"));
    return 0;
}

Technically, I suppose I should add one more minor detail: if the x value in any of your points is a NaN, this won't work correctly. A NaN isn't equal to anything (not even itself) which violates the strict weak ordering required for std::sort.

share|improve this answer
    
Good reply. Please edit to show use of std::sort and a function that compares Point objects. This will allow the OP to use different ordering schemes without changing the Point class each time. :-) –  Thomas Matthews May 4 '11 at 17:54
    
@Thomas: At least IMO, that's not such a great idea. The question indicates interest only in one ordering; IMO, adding others would confuse rather than clarify. –  Jerry Coffin May 4 '11 at 18:26
    
Hi Jerry, thanks for your reply, but I want to do this without change my class Point so tell me the way to do this after entered all my data that's mean in outside of the class Point. thanks –  aki May 4 '11 at 18:42
    
thanks jerry, In my data set, no any NAN value in x. I was compling the codes which you mentioned above but I got a error message; " ostream_iterator is not a member of 'std' " need your help again to solve this. thanks –  aki May 4 '11 at 21:09
    
@aki: did you lose the #include <iterator> perhaps? That should declare std::ostream_iterator. –  Jerry Coffin May 4 '11 at 21:16

The arguments of the cmp function are actually const Point *px in your case. You may not be able to declare them as arguments this way, but you can surely cast the void pointers later.

Further reference here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.